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Search Results for "Kirby"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Kirby found 83 posts

Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father

Stephen Fried, Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father (New York: Crown, 2018) BUY THIS BOOK FROM AMAZON When... The post Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father appeared...

The Dave Nemo Show to Celebrate the Fourth of July with Three JAR Contributors

This July 4th, Sirius XM radio personality Dave Nemo has invited Don Hagist, Wayne Lynch, and James Kirby Martin to discuss aspects of the... The post The Dave Nemo Show to Celebrate the Fourth of July with Three JAR Contributors appeared first on Journal...

Sarah Trimmer née Kirby (1741-1810), author, critic and educational reformer

Sarah Trimmer née Kirby, author, critic and religious and educational reformer, was born in 1741 at Ipswich, the only daughter of the Suffolk landscape painter Joshua Kirby (a close friend of Thomas Gainsborough) and his wife Sarah née Bell....
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Jul 2017

Remember: Six Martyrs at Tyburn on May 30, 1582 and 161

Saint Luke Kirby, Blessed William Filby, Blessed Lawrence Johnson, and Blessed Thomas Cottam SJ, four priests and martyrs suffered at Tyburn Tree on May 30, 1582. Thirty years later, two more Catholic priests joined the blessed clouds of witnesses...

Joshua Kirby (1716 – 1774)

Joshua Kirby died on June 21, 1774 and is buried at St. Anne’s, Kew. His gravestone is no longer especially legible, and my pictures certainly don’t help. Here is my attempt at a transcription. Joshua Kirby FRS-AS/ died 21st June 1774 Aged...
From: Kirby and his world on 20 Jun 2015

May 30, Tyburn Tree in 1582 and 1612

Saint Luke Kirby, Blessed William Filby, Blessed Lawrence Johnson, and Blessed Thomas Cottam SJ, four priests and martyrs suffered at Tyburn Tree on May 30, 1562.  More about them here.Thirty years after St. Luke Kirby and his companions suffered...

William Bayntun

William Bayntun (1717—1785) was a barrister who resided at Gray’s Inn. He was admitted to Gray’s Inn in 1746, when he was already nearly 430, and called to the bar in 1760.  He was the youngest son of Henry Bayntun who was of a junior branch of...
From: Kirby and his world on 21 Mar 2015

Dinner at the Hospital

The Foundling Hospital played an important role in the developing community of artists in London in the 1740s and 1750s. Hogarth was the principal force behind this.  Back in 1740, Hogarth had donated his portrait of Captain Coram to the hospital, and...
From: Kirby and his world on 19 Mar 2015

Office of Works: Departmental Appointments

The Surveyor-General of the Office of Works was appointed by the King, but lesser departmental appointments, such as Joshua Kirby’s to Clerk of the Works at Richmond and Kew, were ordered by the Surveyor-General. The official record of these appointments...
From: Kirby and his world on 22 Aug 2014

Joseph Phillips

Joshua Kirby’s Labourer in Trust at Richmond and Kew was Joseph Phillips. They did not always get along. When Kirby was appointed Clerk of the Works in 1761, Phillips had already been Labourer in Trust for fifteen years. He was appointed to the...
From: Kirby and his world on 18 Aug 2014

Eighteenth-Century Salaries

In 1761, Joshua Kirby and his son William were appointed joint Clerks of the Works and Storekeepers at Richmond and Kew. The two positions of Richmond and Kew always went together, with that of Richmond being considered the more important. Later in the...
From: Kirby and his world on 16 Aug 2014

Clerk of the Works at Richmond and Kew

The various palaces and estates of the royal household were managed by the Office of Works, headed by a Surveyor-General. Each location was supervised by a Clerk of the Works, usually with the assistance of a Labourer in Trust. The Clerk of the Works...
From: Kirby and his world on 14 Aug 2014

A Mystery Box

Reader Gina sends in these pictures of a painted antique wooden box in her possession. Because of the signature, she thinks it may have been painted by, or associated with, John or Joshua Kirby, but there is no detailed provenance. I have not seen or...
From: Kirby and his world on 9 Jun 2014

St. Anne’s, Kew

The church of St. Anne on Kew Green was dedicated in 1714, having been built on land donated by Queen Anne, and is celebrating its tercentenary in 2014. Over the course of the three centuries, the church has been enlarged, renovated and altered numerous...
From: Kirby and his world on 20 Apr 2014

Zoffany’s Resignation Letter

The late 1760s was a bad time for the Society of Artists. Riven by factions, it was failing. A dissident group, including most of the prominent artists broke away and persuaded the king to found a Royal Academy. In a vain attempt to forestall this, the...
From: Kirby and his world on 15 Apr 2014

Zoffany and Kirby

The artist German Johan Zoffany (1733—1810) had a colorful life. Raised in the court of the princes of Thurn und Taxis, he showed an early interest in drawing and studied art first in Germany, and then in Italy where he spent six or seven years at Rome...
From: Kirby and his world on 10 Apr 2014

Critiques of Analysis of Beauty

Paul Sandby didn’t have it all his own way in his attacks on William Hogarth in the wake of the publication of the Analysis of Beauty. Despite misgivings in some quarters about Hogarth’s pretensions in reducing art to the `line of beauty’,...
From: Kirby and his world on 8 Apr 2014

Hogarth’s Disciple

Another of Paul Sandby’s satires against William Hogarth and his line of beauty in 1753 was The Analyst Besh-n in his own Taste. Joshua Kirby is the alarmed figure on the right, identified in the caption as `a Disciple droping the Palate and Brushes...
From: Kirby and his world on 6 Apr 2014

Hogarth’s Fiddler

When William Hogarth published his book, Analysis of Beauty, in late 1753, he was swiftly subjected to an astonishingly virulent satirical print campaign by Paul Sandby, one of the most accomplished satirical artists of the time after Hogarth himself....
From: Kirby and his world on 1 Apr 2014

Joshua Kirby, F.R.S.

Joshua Kirby was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on 26 March 1767. His election card is now, as the Royal Society says on its web page, barely legible, but they do manage a transcription of his citation: Joshua Kirby of Kew in the County of Surry...
From: Kirby and his world on 30 Mar 2014

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.