The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "LMA"

Showing 1 - 20 of 258

Your search for posts with tags containing LMA found 258 posts

Weeknight cooking

 I really try to make most meals at home, which is admittedly more of a challenge some nights than others. But I love cooking -- and I love the fact that I've taught myself so many different recipes over the years. Mostly, I've learned to cook on my...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 8 Apr 2022

February 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Ames’s Almanack, for 1772, may be had at the Printing-Office.” Colonial printers usually began advertising almanacs for the coming year in the fall, first alerting prospective...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Feb 2022

The Taking of the Shuldham, 1781

The fabulous news of the victory at Yorktown was announced in the small town of Stamford, Connecticut, on the coast of Long Island Sound... The post The Taking of the Shuldham, 1781 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

December 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AMES’s ALMANACK, for 1772.  Sold by EDES & GILL, and T. & J. FLEET.” Ebenezer Russell correctly anticipated that some of his competitors would produce and sell a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Dec 2021

December 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Give him the Preference of buying his Ames’s Genuine Almanack before any PIRATED Edition.” Ezekiel Russell claimed that he published “The Original Copy of Ames’s Almanack,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Dec 2021

December 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “THE NEW-ENGLAND ALMANACK … For the Year of our LORD 1772.” As the first day of winter arrived and the new year approached, John Carter and Benjamin West continued marketing...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Dec 2021

December 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Subscriptions for the CENSOR, a New Political Paper.” In a crowded market for selling almanacs, Ezekiel Russell advertised “The Original Copy of Ames’s Almanack, For the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Dec 2021

New Book: García Pérez, ed., “The Making of Juana of Austria”

The Making of Juana of Austria: Gender, Art, and Patronage in Early Modern Iberia, Noelia García Pérez, ed. (LSU Press, 2021). Contributors include: Ana García Sanz, Anne J. Cruz, Annemarie Jordan, José Luis Gonzalo Sánchez-Molero, Kelley Helmstutler...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 18 Nov 2021

November 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “If any wholesale dealers have any of the Universal or Poor Robin’s Almanacks for 1771 on hand … they shall have new ones.” When it came to publishing and advertising...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Nov 2021

November

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “West’s SHEET-ALMANACK, For the Year of our LORD 1772.” In the fall of 1771, Benjamin West, an astronomer and mathematician, and John Carter, printer of the Providence Gazette,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Nov 2021

October 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Neatly engraved … The BOSTON MASSACRE.” In the fall of 1771, Isaiah Thomas, the printer of the Massachusetts Spy, advertised an almanac for the coming year.  In the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Oct 2021

September 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Bickerstaff’s Boston ALMANCK, For the Year 1772.” With the arrival of fall in 1771 newspaper advertisements for almanacs for 1772 became more numerous and more extensive. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Sep 2021

September 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Price Three Shillings per single Dozen, Two Shillings and Sixpence per Dozen by the Quantity.” As fall arrived in 1771 advertisements for almanacs began appearing in newspapers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Sep 2021

September 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Just Published … POOR RICHARD’S ALMANACK, for the YEAR 1772.” It was a familiar sign of the changing seasons when advertisements for almanacs first appeared in colonial...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Sep 2021

August 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Bickerstaff’s Almanack For the Year 1772, Will be published in September next.” Even though the middle of August 1771 was early, John Fleeming apparently determined that...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Aug 2021

This Week on Dispatches: Bill Bleyer on the Culpeper Spy Ring

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews writer and historian Bill Bleyer on sifting fact from fiction about the legendary Culpeper Spy Ring.... The post This Week on Dispatches: Bill Bleyer on the Culpeper Spy Ring appeared first on...

Peter von Hagenbach and the world’s first international war crimes trial

The Nuremberg trials that followed the close of World War II were, like the atrocities they prosecuted, unprecedented in international law. And yet the idea that political and military leaders might be held accountable for their actions was not entirely...
From: Mathew Lyons on 1 Jul 2021

The Incredible Story of Hercules Mulligan

When you are a spy, you want to go unnoticed. With a colorful name like Hercules Mulligan, that can sometimes be difficult, especially if... The post The Incredible Story of Hercules Mulligan appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.