The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing LSE found 129 posts

British Soldier John Ward Wins Back His Pocketbook

We expect writers for the Journal of the American Revolution to use primary sources—things written as close as possible to the time of the events... The post British Soldier John Ward Wins Back His Pocketbook appeared first on Journal of the American...

May 26

GUEST CURATOR:  Kelsey Savoy What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Every Article in the Apothecary Way.” Nathaniel Dabney owned a shop called “Head of HIPPOCRATES” in Salem, Massachusetts. In an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 May 2022

Welcome, Guest Curator Kelsey Savoy

Kelsey Savoy is a junior at Assumption University in Worcester, Massachusetts. She is majoring in Political Science with minors in Core Texts and Enduring Questions; Law, Ethics, and Constitutional Studies; and Philosophy. She is also a member of the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 May 2022

A Georgian Trip Advisor – Part One

When we’re looking for somewhere to dine out, we often use a website, such as Trip Advisor (others available, of course), but did you know that something similar existed in the 18th century? Well, today’s guest, who I am delighted to welcome, is historian...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 May 2022

The Original Chelsea Bun House

As it  is approaching Good Friday I thought I would share some information about the original Chelsea Bun House. Easter is traditionally the time for hot cross buns which are slightly different to Chelsea buns as the Chelsea bun is made of a rich yeast...
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Apr 2022

The lost tomb of Henry VIII: design, appearance and fate

Image: St George’s Chapel, Windsor; Andrewkbrook1, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons Henry VIII was buried in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on 16th February 1547. However, although he is one of the most recognisable figures of English history...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 16 Feb 2022

A Spider at the Pulse

By Yijie Huang I received a gift from my supervisor this spring, a vial of “POSITIVITY Pulse Point Oil” from ESPA. As a historian of pulse diagnosis in early modern medicine, I am fascinated by it–not so much by the joyful fragrance, but by what...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Sep 2021

From Cyclopaedia to Encyclopédie: experiments in machine translation and sequence alignment

Figure 1. Title page from the 1745 prospectus of the first Encyclopédie project. This page image is taken from ARTFL’s ‘18th Volume’ of the Encyclopédie. It is well known that the Encyclopédie ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Sep 2021

Gothic Spaniards & Gendered Blindness in the JEMCS, Winter

The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 20/1 (2020): José Juan Villagrana, “The Apocalyptic Spanish Race.” Kelsey J. Ihinger, “‘Ojos que no ven’: Gendered Blindness in María de Zayas’s Desengaños amorosos.”
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 30 Jul 2021

Review: Gold and Glory Exhibition, Hampton Court Palace

Last Friday, I took the opportunity of being in the vicinity of Richmond to visit the Hampton Court Palace and, in particular, the Gold and Glory exhibition (running until 5 September 2021). Originally due to take place in 2020 to … Continue reading...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 2 Jun 2021

Finding Your Beard Style in the 19th Century

In the previous post I noted the variety of facial hair styles that were worn by men in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, depending on factors including status, location and age. Rather than each age having one particular style of facial hair that...
From: DrAlun on 12 Mar 2021

Klop Ustinov

Among the many actors, performers and artists my diarist June S. met in Chelsea and the West End of London was ‘Klop’ Ustinov, father of the rather better remembered wit, raconteur and performer Peter Ustinov. June encountered this extraordinary...
From: Naomi Clifford on 3 Dec 2020

“Brisk Firing” along the Rivers in 1775

When we last peeked in on Malden during the siege of Boston, a British raiding party from Charlestown had crossed the Mystic River and burned the building at the Penny Ferry landing.The Continental Army officer assigned to that spot, Capt. Eleazer Lindsey,...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Aug 2020

Revisiting Chelsea Clark’s The Wonders of Unicorn Horns: Preventions and Cures for Poisoning

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a wonderful post from Chelsea Clark in 2012 on the intersection of magic and medicine from Early Modern England. Drawing on the seventeenth century  manuscript ascribed to the herbalist Johanna St. John, Clark...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Jun 2020

How Malden Managed “Our Cannon”

On 21 Apr 1775, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s Committee of Safety officially set up its artillery regiment by sending for Richard Gridley, Scarborough Gridley, and David Mason, three of the top four officers in that unit.At the same time...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2020

Book Chapters on Witchcraft

The Science of Demons: Early Modern Authors Facing Witchcraft and the Devil, Jan Machielsen, ed. (Routledge, 2020). 1. The Inquisitor’s Demons: Nicolau Eymeric’s Directorium Inquisitorum Pau Castell Granados 11. Demonology as Textual...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 16 Apr 2020

David Lamson, a Middle-Aged Man of Menotomy

David Lamson was among the men from Cambridge who served in the French and Indian War, according to provincial muster rolls examined by local historian Lucius R. Paige. Lamson himself had some Native ancestry and probably some African since he was later...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2020

‘Dutch Sam’ the Boxer

Boxing matches or pugilism were very popular spectator sports, not to mention very lucrative with many men willing to fight for prize money. Here we take a brief look at a fight which lasted 58 and a half minutes, with 43 well-contested rounds between...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Nov 2019

The Pulse, Buildings, and the Therapeutics of Design

Maiken Scott hosts the excellent “The Pulse” on WHYY here in Philadelphia. Each episode explores “stories about the people and places at the heart of health and science.” Or, put another way, each week Maiken Scott spends a delightfully...
From: Darin Hayton on 14 Nov 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.