The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Lafayette"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Lafayette found 57 posts

Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries

Thomas Jefferson and Julia Child. Not two people you’d expect to be linked in history. But yet, indeed they are—as two gourmets who loved... The post Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries appeared first on Journal of the American...

Lit Up

The streetlight right near my house has been out since January, so lower Chestnut Street  is bathed in darkness every night. There are some benefits to this, as this light shines right into my bedroom window when operational, but I still...
From: streets of salem on 22 Jul 2019

An Archive about Commemorating Bunker Hill

The Raab Collection is offering for sale an archive of documents collected by the Bunker-Hill Memorial Association as it built the monument in Charlestown and commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill.The Raab Collection webpage...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2019

The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI

1785 was a rare year in Paris—it was safely nestled between revolutions. The American Revolution had come to an official end right there in... The post The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI appeared...

“I am My Dear Marquis with the truest affection…”

There was a lot of news coverage earlier this month about locating a letter from Alexander Hamilton to the Marquis de Lafayette that was stolen from the Massachusetts State Archives sometime around 1940. Fortunately for the study of history, the archive...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2019

Assessing “Bradshaw’s Supposititious Epitaph”

As I quoted yesterday, around 1828 Nicholas Philip Trist, husband of one of Thomas Jefferson’s granddaughters, found an old chest in the former President’s attic. In an appendix to his three-volume biography of Jefferson, Henry S. Randall...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 May 2019

The Double Spy: The Service and Suffering of Caleb Bruen

“But while a confidence trickster, a play actor or a gambler can return from his performance to the ranks of his admirers, the secret... The post The Double Spy: The Service and Suffering of Caleb Bruen appeared first on Journal of the American...

Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore

History occasionally provides a pleasant surprise by revealing the record of an ordinary person who, thrust into a unique role, performed extraordinary services for... The post Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore appeared first on Journal...

The Glorious Career and Unfortunate Death of John Laurens

George Washington surrounded himself with the best and the brightest young men involved in the revolutionary cause. Alexander Hamilton, Tench Tilghman, Robert Harrison, the... The post The Glorious Career and Unfortunate Death of John Laurens appeared...

Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures

Documents that contain the original signatures of more than one Continental Army general are rare.  During the eight years of the Revolutionary War, generals... The post Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures appeared...

Challenging Lafayette’s Legacy: Race and Republicanism in France and the United States

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Aurélia Aubert In March 1825, Achille Murat, a recent settler in Florida and nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, heard that the Marquis de Lafayette was touring the United States.[1]...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Apr 2018

“Monumental Narratives” Symposium at Wellesley, 10 Mar.

On Saturday, 10 March, Wellesley College will host this year’s Wellesley-Deerfield symposium, “Monumental Narratives: Revisiting New England’s Public Memorials.” The event description says:As southern Civil War memorials have become...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2018

The Original “Cradle of Liberty”

In an attempt to make the Super Bowl more appealing to the general public, the presidents of the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston and the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia have laid a wager on the outcome. If the Patriots lose,...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2018

Why I’m Dubious about the “letter from an officer in Charles-Town”

Yesterday I quoted a letter published in the Pennsylvania Packet in December 1781, reportedly written by a British army officer to a friend back home in May of that year.Some American newspapers reprinted the letter, stating it had appeared in the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Aug 2017

When Jefferson Investigated the Storming of the Bastille

Since this is Bastille Day, I’m linking to Sara Georgini’s article on for the Smithsonian magazine, “How the Key to the Bastille Ended Up in George Washington’s Possession.”Here’s a taste:On July 14, 1789, a surge of...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jul 2017

Looking through Jefferson’s Eyes

Another provocative recent article about the eighteenth century is Maurizio Valsania’s “French Hovels, Slave Cabins, and the Limits of Jefferson’s Eyes” on the Oxford University Press blog.Valsania, a professor of American history...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2017

Marquis de Lafayette and His Affair with Aglaé of Hunolstein

Today we are delighted to welcome back the author, Geri Walton. Geri has long been interested in history and fascinated by the stories of people from the 1700 and 1800s. This led her to get a degree in History and resulted in her website, which offers...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Mar 2017

Lafayette: An acerbic tongue or an incisive judge of character?

A truly French and American hero, Marquis de Lafayette, a nineteen-year-old nobleman without significant military or political experiences, joined the fledgling American Revolution at... The post Lafayette: An acerbic tongue or an incisive judge of character?...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.