The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Law"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Law found 898 posts

An Acquittal and a Conviction

On 29 Aug 1775, Gen. George Washington told Richard Henry Lee, “I have at this time one Colo., one Major, one Captn, & two Subalterns under arrest for tryal.”The colonel was John Mansfield of Lynn, originally scheduled to be tried in early...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Sep 2020

September 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “To be SOLD … Best PORTER.” Colonial printers often devoted as much space to advertising as news, editorials, and other content in their newspapers.  Advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Sep 2020

“As if I approved of such proceedings”

On Tuesday, 27 August, the day after a mob destroyed Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s house, some people blamed the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew’s latest sermon.In his history of Massachusetts, Hutchinson wrote the sermon had implied “approbation...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Aug 2020

The Point of a John Adams Presidential Library

As I noted yesterday, earlier this year Mayor Thomas Koch of Quincy raised the idea of moving John Adams’s books from the Boston Public Library, where they’ve been for a century and a quarter, to his city. That was part of an ambitious speech...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Aug 2020

Walter Scott Rules in a Case of Wrongful Dismissal in 181

By Stephen Basdeo I came across a fascinating little book in a shop today, from 1918, titled Sir Walter Scott as Judge, transcribed and edited by John Chisholm. Chisholm was the Sheriff of Roxburgh, Berwick, and Selkirk in the early 1900s and filled...

“The most appropriate and useful place for the collection”

Yesterday I quoted John Adams’s deed donating his library to the town of Quincy. The former President also granted the town some of the land he owned to build an academy, where the library was supposed to go, and a new Congregational church.In February...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Aug 2020

A Philosophical Explosion

 Glass drops demonstration in slow motion(Starts after the ad)Previously, we started a tour through Europe that followed the introduction of an item called a "glass drop,"  "Prince Rupert's drop" or "Dutch tear." [1] Today we will explore the...
From: Conciatore on 21 Aug 2020

When John Adams Gave Away His Library

In the summer of 1822, John Adams was feeling generous toward his home town and considering his legacy. The ex-President was then eighty-six years old.On 25 June, Adams deeded to the town of Quincy two tracts of land to fund a stone “Temple”...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2020

“I hereby revoke all and every Sentence”

Recently I came across this advertisement in the 13 Oct 1768 Boston News-Letter:Whereas the Wife of me the Subscriber has eloped from me, and I am apprehensive she will run me in Debt. I hereby forbid all Persons from trusting her on my Account, as I...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Aug 2020

Law Enforcement Officials and the Limits of Violence in Medieval England

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 18 August 2020. Towards the end of the fifteenth century, William Hemyng, a chaplain associated with Hereford cathedral, experienced a harrowing ordeal. Richard Rollesden, undersheriff to Thomas Parker, the county sheriff, stole...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 18 Aug 2020

How Did John Adams Respond to Abigail’s “Remember the Ladies”?

Women in all states won the universal right to vote one hundred years ago through the ratification of the United States Constitution’s 19th Amendment... The post How Did John Adams Respond to Abigail’s “Remember the Ladies”? appeared...

When Did the American Revolution Begin?

Is this the anniversary of the day the American Revolution began? That of course depends on accepting the idea that the American Revolution started on an identifiable day instead of building up gradually. Some revolutions are seen to start with a bang,...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Aug 2020

Women, gender and non-lethal violence in Quarter Sessions petitioning narratives

Cleaned-up and slightly extended version of a paper presented at the conference Gender and Violence in the Early Modern World (University of Cambridge, 23 November 2019). Introduction In 1594 Allys Whittingham, William Bealey and Margery his wife petitioned...
From: Early Modern Notes on 13 Aug 2020

On the Business of War

The business of war is unfortunately all too present in today’s world, yet the activities of weapons researchers and developers, arms manufacturers, military contractors, military gear designers, military trade shows, gun dealers, military suppliers,...

More Mild Mayhem in Marlborough

All right, now that I’ve calmed down from spotting William Benson staying out of the political dispute/gang brawl in Marlborough on 17 July 1770, I can move on to the people who were actually involved.The “Honest Ploughjogger” letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2020

“That obstinate Wretch will not remove his few things”

Yesterday I started quoting Abigail Adams’s July 1775 letter to her husband John reporting on her conflict with a tenant and farm hand named Hayden.Abigail had asked Hayden to move out of the house where John had been born, or to use only some rooms...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jul 2020

Capt. Preston and the Boston Committee

At 3:00 P.M. on Friday, 13 July 1770—250 years ago today—the white men of Boston resumed their town meeting in Faneuil Hall.There was only one item of real business: approving a town committee’s response to what was being published in...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jul 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.