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Your search for posts with tags containing Law found 599 posts

Valentine’s Notes for Martha Washington

In the Washington Papers is a document dated 25 Oct 1759, about a year and a half after George had met Martha and nine and a half months after they married. It’s headed “An Account of the Sail of the Estate of Colo. Custis Decst in WmsBurg.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2018

Star Chamber Stories: Elizabethan Witchcraft, Sorcery, and a Very Troubled Marriage

Posted by Krista Kesselring; 14 February 2018. As noted in my last post, stories from the Court of Star Chamber’s proceedings can offer remarkable glimpses into early modern law and everyday life. Given the wide, wide range of wrongs the court was...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 14 Feb 2018

#YouToo, Helena?: All’s Well That Ends Well and Sexual Consent

By Kelsey Ridge, The Shakespeare Institute Helena and Count Bertram before the King of France by Francis Wheatley, 1793 There are many questions inspired by Shakespeare’s problem play of dubious decision-making, All’s Well That End’s...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 13 Feb 2018

Call for Papers on “Fashion and Conflict” from Historic Deerfield

Historic Deerfield is planning a symposium on clothing on 28-30 September 2018 and just issued the call for papers.The theme of this symposium is “Fashion and Conflict in Early America.” The call elaborates:Clashes between European rivals,...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2018

The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a five-part series. The “Diary” of Lieutenant James McMichael first appeared in 1890 in the Pennsylvania Archives... The post The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776 appeared...

The Other Author of “The Liberty Song”

Earlier this month I wrote about “The Liberty Song,” which became popular throughout Britain’s North American colonies in late 1768.The main author of that song, everyone agrees, was the Pennsylvania and Delaware lawyer John Dickinson....
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2018

Reading Robin Hood in World War Two (1939–45): Data from Mass Observation

Before the twentieth century, Robin Hood was a literary figure: he is the main protagonist in a number of important literary works such as A Gest of Robyn Hode (c. 1450); Anthony Munday’s The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntington and The Death...

Print, Public Sympathy and Material Support Before the Law in Eighteenth-Century London: The Case of Elizabeth Canning

By Joanne McEwan, The University of Western Australia On 1 January 1753, eighteen-year-old servant maid Elizabeth Canning disappeared on her way home from her aunt and uncle’s house in London. Four weeks later, she turned up at her mother’s...
From: Histories of Emotion on 26 Jan 2018

“At my trial for caning Gill”

In April 1768 John Mein went on trial for assaulting rival printer John Gill. In fact, he faced two trials—in criminal and civil court.On 19 April the local magistrates cited Mein for criminal assault and fined him 40 shillings, or £2. Not...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jan 2018

“Two violent blows…upon the back part of the head”

On 18 Jan 1768, John Mein of the Boston Chronicle asked Benjamin Edes of the Boston Gazette to identify “Americus,” who had attacked him in a newspaper essay. Edes refused.On 19 January, Mein asked again, hinting that this was a matter of...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2018

January 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (January 14, 1768).“He hath a medallion in clay … as a specimen of his abilities.” In addition to marketing a “Neat assortment”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Jan 2018

Apostasy, Sanctuary, and Spin: The Canons of Waltham and Sanctuary at St. Martin le Grand, 143

Guest post by Shannon McSheffrey; posted 12 January 2018. In 1430, Henry Ciprian and Roger Bukke, two Augustinian canons, fled from their priory at Waltham, Essex, and sought sanctuary at the collegiate church of St. Martin le Grand in London. Their request...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 12 Jan 2018

When Was the British New Year Begin Before 1752?

The earliest examples of a poetic address from colonial American newspaper carriers to their customers on New Year’s Day are all from the fast-growing city of Philadelphia. The first three date from the years 1720-22. No broadsides of those addresses...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jan 2018

The Use and Abuse of Isaac Newton

Bitcoin’s recent rise has prompted an ever growing number of people to misstate and otherwise abuse Newton’s laws of motions. Predictions of a Bitcoin crash typically invoke “Newton’s Law of Universal Gravity states that what goes...
From: Darin Hayton on 29 Dec 2017

Goldilocks and the Three Bears: A Tale of Vagrancy and Imprisonment, by Robert Southey (1774-1843)

One of the writers that I have encountered frequently in my research upon both Robin Hood and Wat Tyler is the Romantic author and Poet Laureate, Robert Southey (1774–1843).[i] Southey’s contribution to popular culture has, in my opinion,...

1643 The New England Confederation

The New England ConfederationThe New England Confederation, was a political and military alliance of the English colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. Established May 29, 1643. Its primary purpose was to unite the Puritan colonies...
From: 17th-century American Women on 21 Dec 2017

The Mystery of “Mucius Scævola”

Isaiah Thomas’s Massachusetts Spy started to publish the essays of “Mucius Scævola” on 30 May 1771, four months after Joseph Greenleaf advertised his property in Abington for sale. That summer there was a dispute over which Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2017

Joseph Greenleaf and “the Council-chamber in Boston”

On 16 Nov 1771, the day after Joseph Greenleaf declined to meet with Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and the Massachusetts Council (on the understandable grounds that his teen-aged son was dying), the Council issued a formal summons for him:You are required to...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Dec 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.