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Search Results for "Law"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Law found 962 posts

Investigating Slaves at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House

Last month the Cambridge Historical Society issued a report on the history of slavery at its headquarters, called the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House.In particular, the society wanted to collect information about any enslaved people living in that farmhouse...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Feb 2021

Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: New Jersey Soldier Oliver Cromwell

Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in 1849. She became a major conductor on the Underground Railroad, as well as an advocate for Women’s Rights.... The post Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: New Jersey Soldier Oliver...

“Adventurous Wives” Conference via Chawton House

Chawton House is an Elizabethan manor once owned by Jane Austen’s brother. It houses the research library of the Centre for the Study of Early Women’s Writing, 1600–1830.In that capacity, Chawton House will host an online conference...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2021

The Forest Rebel

“His hand was against every man, and every man’s hand against him”—Genesis “The world was not his friend, nor the world’s law”—Shakespeare A German academic, colleague and close...

Exits, Entries and the Allure of the Runaway Nun

Guest post by Gwen Seabourne, 17 February 2021. Entries on the rolls of judicial sessions in Yorkshire in 1304 and 1306 tell tales of disturbing events at two of the county’s convents. Representatives of Barkston Ash and the Ainsty informed...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 17 Feb 2021

Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: Edward Hector, Bombardier and Wagoner

Nat Turner launched a bloody uprising among enslaved Virginians in Southampton County in 1831 the same year that William Lloyd Garrison of Boston began... The post Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: Edward Hector, Bombardier...

London Imprints on Boston Bibles?

In 1756 the Boston Overseers of the Poor indentured Isaiah Thomas as an apprentice to the printer Zechariah Fowle (1724-1776). He was seven years old and didn’t yet know how to read. Isaiah’s father had died, and his mother apparently felt...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2021

Surviving an Execution in Medieval England and Modern Ohio: Miracle, or Incompetence?

Posted by Sara M. Butler; 5 February 2021. In Ohio, Governor DeWine’s landmark 8 December 2020 press conference has left the future of felony execution in the state up in the air. The indefinite delay in capital punishment announced back in 2018...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 5 Feb 2021

“The printed Narratives of the late horred Massacre”

This week I watched an online talk by Robert Darnton about his new book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment. He described various stratagems printers and booksellers used to get around two stifling forces in ancien régime...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2021

Thou Shalt Not Steal: Plunder, Theft, and Sticky Fingers

“The cunning man steals a horse, the wise man lets him alone.”[1] It had been less than three months since Congress had adopted a... The post Thou Shalt Not Steal: Plunder, Theft, and Sticky Fingers appeared first on Journal of the American...

Legal Trouble in Pembroke

Back on Thanksgiving, I mentioned that the Rev. Kilborn Whitman (1765-1835, shown here) delivered the holiday sermon in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1798. I also noted that Whitman decided not to get involved in the Quincy Congregationalist meeting’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2021

A New Year’s Gift and the Power to Pardon

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 1 January 2021. New Year’s Day traditionally served as an occasion for giving gifts. Some such gifts consisted of words of warning and advice, as tokens of the authors’ best wishes for a good and prosperous...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 1 Jan 2021

December 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Catalogues may be had at Mr. Thomas Williams and Company’s Store in Annapolis.” Newspaper advertisements were the most common form of marketing media in eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Dec 2020

Press Coverage of the Owen Richards Riot

On 21 May 1770, Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy reported: Last Friday Night Owen Richards, one of the Tidesmen belonging to the Custom-House, was Tarred, Feathered and Carted thro’ the Town for several hours, for having as ’tis...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2020

“I believe they are a smuggling”

With less than two weeks left in 2020, there are still some significant events in 1770 that I missed discussing on their Sestercentennials, so I’m trying to catch up. The first of those events took place on 18 May and centered on Owen Richards,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2020

John Haslet’s World: An Ardent Patriot, the Delaware Blues, and the Spirit of 1776

John Haslet’s World: An Ardent Patriot, the Delaware Blues, and the Spirit of 1776 by David Price. (Nashville, TN: Knox Press, 2020) “‘Noted for his... The post John Haslet’s World: An Ardent Patriot, the Delaware Blues, and...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.