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Search Results for "Leo X"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Leo X found 23 posts

The end of a European union

A decades-long union of European countries is supported by the respective national elites; but its destruction comes through the ruthless exploitation of popular nationalism by an autocratic leader. Does that sound familiar? It is, of course, the Kalmar...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Borgo Pinti (Part II)

Palazzo Ximenes Panciatichi da Sangallo, 68 Borgo Pinti, Florence. Antonio Neri spent his childhood on Borgo Pinti in Florence. Although he would come to live and work in different parts of the city, then later in Pisa and Antwerp, it is here on this...
From: Conciatore on 28 Apr 2017

Blessed John Storey: Kidnapped and Executed

Dom Bede Camm, in his survey of the martyrs beatified by Pope Leo XIII, compares Blessed John Storey (or Story) to Blessed (as he was then) Thomas More: two laymen, involved in the courts, married with families, serving their monarchs in the prosecution...

Borgo Pinti (Part 2)

Palazzo Ximenes Panciatichi da Sangallo, 68 Borgo Pinti, Florence. Antonio Neri spent his childhood on Borgo Pinti in Florence. Although he would come to live and work in different parts of the city, then later in Pisa and Antwerp, it is here on this...
From: Conciatore on 25 Apr 2016

OREMUS: Our Lady of Walsingham

Oremus, the monthly magazine of Westminster Cathedral, features a story about the restoration of the cathedral's statue of Our Lady of Walsingham. Her feast is on September 24:This statue of Our Lady of Walsingham has a particularly beautiful face, which...

August Martyrs: Blessed Thomas Percy

Today's martyr is Blessed Thomas Percy, the seventh Earl of Northumberland, beatified in 1895. Pope Leo XIII made some interesting choices of English martyrs to beatify. For example, Blessed Thomas Percy's father, Sir Thomas Percy, executed for his part...

August Martyrs: The Blesseds Felton, Father and Son

Today's saint is not to be confused with the John Felton who assassinated the Duke of Buckingham during the reign of King James I. Blessed John Felton (executed 8 August 1570) was an English Catholic martyr, who was executed during the reign of Elizabeth...

The Penultimate Late July Martyrs: Catherine of Aragon's Chaplains

On July 30, 1540, two different sets of martyrs set off for Smithfield for execution. There were three Catholics, who had refused to swear Henry VIII's Oaths of Succession and Supremacy, and there were three Protestants--more properly, Zwinglians--who...

Blessed Thomas Woodhouse, English Jesuit Protomartyr

According to this website for the Jesuit Curia in Rome:Thomas Woodhouse (1535-1573) was the first Jesuit to die in the conflict between pope and English crown, although he was only admitted to the Society just before his arrest. He was probably ordained...

480 Years Ago; Three More Carthusian Priors Martyred

On June 19, 1535, the second group of Carthusians were executed: Blesses Humphrey Middlemore, William Exmew and Sebastian Newdigate. Arrested on May 25, they had been imprisoned in Marshalea for about a fortnight before their trial at Westminster on June...

Reading Abbey: The Lost Tomb and the Last Abbot

According to the BBC History Magazine, researchers might find the burial site of King Henry I (William the Conqueror's fourth son) which has been lost since Reading Abbey was suppressed in the Dissolution of the Monasteries.A search for the remains of...

Heresy or Treason? Blessed John Forest

Blessed John Forest is the only Supremacy Martyr to be executed by being burned alive, sentenced by Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, with the penalty of death carried out by the state. He was found guilty of the same offenses as the Carthusians and John Fisher,...

Carthusian Martyrs in York, 1537

On May 11, 1537, two of the Carthusians of the Charterhouse of London began their agonizing and slow death by being hung in chains from the York city battlements: Blessed John Rochester and Blessed James Walworth. They were beatified by Pope Leo XIII...

Borgo Pinti (Part 2)

Palazzo Ximenes Panciatichi da Sangallo,68 Borgo Pinti, Florence.Antonio Neri spent his childhood on Borgo Pinti in Florence. Although he would come to live and work in different parts of the city, then later in Pisa and Antwerp, it is here on this street...
From: Conciatore on 11 Mar 2015

Leonine Prayers after Mass

With the two crises of Black Masses in Cambridge, Mass. and Oklahoma City, Okla, mocking the Catholic faith and desecrating the Sacramental Host, Catholics have been urged to pray the Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel, composed by Pope Leo XIII:Saint...

Borgo Pinti (part 2)

Palazzo Ximenes Panciatichi da Sangallo, 68 Borgo Pinti, FlorenceAntonio Neri spent his childhood on Borgo Pinti in Florence. Although he would come to live and work in different parts of the city, then later in Pisa and Antwerp, it is here on this street...
From: Conciatore on 5 Mar 2014

Cardinal Merry del Val, RIP

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, hear me.From the desire of being esteemed, deliver me, O Jesus.From the desire of being loved,From the desire of being extolled,From the desire of being honored,From the desire of being praised,From the desire of being...

Father and Son Martyrs: The Feltons of Bermondsey Abbey

Today is the anniversary of the martyrdom of Blessed John Felton (executed 8 August 1570) during the reign of Elizabeth I in the aftermath of the Northern Rebellion and the publication of Regnans in excelsis by Pope St. Pius V:Almost all of what is known...

Pope Leo XIII, RIP

Pope Leo XIII died on July 20, 1903. He was born Gioacchino Vincenzo Raffaele Luigi on March 2, 1810 and elected as the Vicar of Christ on February 20, 1878. As this article from the Catholic Encyclopedia describes his papacy, he had great impact on the...

Pope Leo XIII to the Catholics of England

Thanks to the blog The Guild of Blessed Titus Brandsma comes this selection from an Apostolic Letter from Pope Leo XIII to England (and a link to the entire text on this website). Pope Leo XIII (photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons--from a film of the...

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