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Search Results for "Lexington"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Lexington found 170 posts

Thorson on “Stone Walls on Minute Man,” 27 Feb.

On Saturday, 27 February, the Friends of Minute Man National Park will host its free Winter Lecture, this time beamed through the walls of our own homes. This year Prof. Robert Thorson will speak about “The Stone Walls of Minute Man National Park.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2021

The Guns that Didn’t Bark

One of my big unanswered questions about the Battle of Lexington and Concord on 19 Apr 1775 is why the provincial forces didn’t deploy any of the cannon they had just spent months collecting and preparing for a fight. The guns that James Barrett...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Feb 2021

“Two peices of Cannon Brought From Watertown to ye Towns”

The 3 Feb 1775 petition to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety about eight iron cannon can’t answer the question of what happened to those guns. Did the congress assume control of them and add them to their other weapons?...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2021

Four Representative Men

I’ve been analyzing a letter about cannon sent to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety in February 1775.This posting looks at the four men who signed that letter, in order of their signatures. James Barrett (1710-1779)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2021

Mounting Expenses for Four Towns

This posting continues the analysis of a 3 Feb 1775 letter that I started quoting yesterday, from men in four different towns to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety.Yesterday’s extract shows the letter was about eight...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2021

Some Say the Tea Will End in Fire

Today’s the 247th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, which is impressive, though not quite at Sestercentennial level.Earlier this month a student working on a History Day project asked me why the Sons of Liberty tossed the East India Company tea...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Dec 2020

Lord Dartmouth’s War of Words, 1775

It was late 1775, and William Legge, the 2nd Earl of Dartmouth, was looking out the window of his office in Whitehall, London, thinking... The post Lord Dartmouth’s War of Words, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775

It had been a very hectic week in Williamsburg for Peyton Randolph, the Speaker of Virginia’s House of Burgesses and the President of the... The post Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Knott on the Washington-Hamilton Relationship, 15 May

On Friday, 15 May, the Lexington Historical Society is hosting its annual Cronin Lecture—but this year the talk will be online. The event announcement says:Join Stephen Knott, co-author [with Tony Williams] of Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 May 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Patrick Naughton on Information Control and the Battles of Lexington and Concord

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews active US Army Major and JAR contributor Patrick Naughton on the narrative created by the Provincial Congress... The post This Week on Dispatches: Patrick Naughton on Information Control...

The Story of the Soldier and the Spoons

In The Battle of April 19, 1775, Frank W. Coburn included this anecdote about the aftermath of the British march:About a sixth of a mile yet farther along, stood the home of Samuel Hastings, near the Lexington boundary line, yet within the town of Lincoln....
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Apr 2020

The Later Adventures of Solomon Brown

In 2008 and 2011 I wrote about Solomon Brown of Lexington, who did as much as any individual to start the Revolutionary War in that town.At the age of eighteen, Solomon Brown:spotted British army officers riding through town and alerted local militia leaders.volunteered...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Apr 2020

Prepping for Patriots’ Day 2020 Online

The anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord is coming up on 19 April, so I’ll shift topics (mostly) from the Sestercentennial of the reaction to the Boston Massacre to the opening of the Revolutionary War.Of course, right now we’re...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Apr 2020

Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain

The efforts of the American Provincial Congress at the beginning of the revolutionary war against Great Britain offer the perfect case study to understand... The post Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain...

A Sampler of Bethiah Hastings

Yesterday Stacey Fraser at the Lexington Historical Society shared an image of a sampler from its collection and thoughts about its political significance. “This sampler was completed by Bethiah Hastings of Lexington at age 8” in 1774, Fraser...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jan 2020

Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action

The British approach to its American colony in 1775 offers valuable lessons for historians and military professionals in the synthesis between the levels of... The post Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action appeared first...

Adelman on “Revolutionary Networks”

If you’re intrigued by the stories of John Mein, Edes and Gill, Mills and Hicks, and other Boston printers behaving badly, check out Joseph M. Adelman’s new book Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Nov 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.