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Search Results for "Lexington and Concord"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Lexington and Concord found 31 posts

Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain

The efforts of the American Provincial Congress at the beginning of the revolutionary war against Great Britain offer the perfect case study to understand... The post Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain...

Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action

The British approach to its American colony in 1775 offers valuable lessons for historians and military professionals in the synthesis between the levels of... The post Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action appeared first...

This Week on Dispatches: Rick Atkinson on The British Are Coming

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Pulitzer-prize winning author Rick Atkinson about his latest book, the best-selling The British are Coming: The War... The post This Week on Dispatches: Rick Atkinson on <i>The British...

Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775

In early 1775, the town major of Quebec decided to pay a visit to Gen. Thomas Gage in Boston. William Dunbar had been an... The post Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt

On one Sunday morning in late April 1775, news arrived in Spencertown, New York, of the occurrences at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. This alarm... The post The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War Begins, 1775

By the end of 1774, Catharine Macaulay had met Benjamin Rush, Arthur Lee, Richard Marchant, and Benjamin Franklin, and had corresponded with John Dickinson, James... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War...

Eyewitness to the British Retreat from Lexington: The Timothy Pickering Letter

A newly appointed colonel in the Essex County militia, Timothy Pickering led some 700 men of the Salem and Essex militia toward Boston, Massachusetts,... The post Eyewitness to the British Retreat from Lexington: The Timothy Pickering Letter appeared...

“Be A King George”

“Be a King George.” Four simple, but oft repeated words drilled into the Prince of Wales from childhood by his mother, Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.... The post “Be A King George” appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“the roads filld with frighted women & children”

HANNAH WINTHROP continued her letter to MERCY OTIS WARREN in May of 1775 describing the flight from Concord to a place of safety. She is saddened by the closure of Harvard and the disruption of education for its students. She fears for the library and...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Apr 2018

“the horrors of that midnight Cry”

HANNAH WINTHROP continued her correspondence with MERCY OTIS WARREN, sharing news of the occupation of Boston by the British: “Loads of english goods…the fortifying of Boston neck, [and] the huge canon now mounted there,” that has led...
From: In the Words of Women on 9 Apr 2018

The April 19, 1775 Civilian Evacuation of Lexington

“This is My Little Girl That I Was So Afraid the Red Coats Would Get” One important aspect of the Battle of Lexington that... The post The April 19, 1775 Civilian Evacuation of Lexington appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“every Day Brings New Troubels”

The young Pleasantdale, New Jersey woman JEMIMA CONDICT wrote in her journal that in April 1775 she went with her father to watch the militia drill. Monday Which was Called Training Day I Rode with my Dear father Down to see them train there Being Several...
From: In the Words of Women on 20 Mar 2017

Cannons and Concord

As a subscriber to J.L. Bell’s blog Boston 1775, and an admirer of his work, I am pleased to note that he has a book just out. Entitled The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War, it tells the story of four cannons...
From: In the Words of Women on 26 May 2016

The Loyalist Guides of Lexington and Concord

When Parliament passed the Boston Port Bill in 1774, in an attempt to break the Massachusetts colonists of their resistance to crown policy, it also authorized Gen. Thomas Gage to undertake any military measures necessary to help bring the colony under...

A Fast Ship from Salem: Carrying News of War

On April 24, General Gage sent his account of the confrontations at Lexington and Concord aboard the 200-ton, cargo-ladened Sukey to Lord Barrington, the Secretary of War and to the Earl of Dartmouth, the Secretary of State for the Colonies.[1] His letter...

5 Great Intelligence Successes

Good Revolutionary War commanders understood the value of intelligence on their adversaries. The great eighteenth century military theorist Marshal de Saxe, who was on every good general’s reading list, wrote that to win in battle “nothing more is...

How Paul Revere’s Ride was Published and Censored in 1775

Because of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s famous poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride,” most people think that Revere was critical to the start of the Revolutionary War. In trying to dispel Longfellow’s myth of a lone hero, modern scholars have portrayed...

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.