The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Libraries"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Libraries found 270 posts

Dealing Out the Cards at the B.P.L.

Earlier this month, the Boston Public Library’s Rare Books and Manuscripts department announced that it had finished scanning its entire card catalogue and uploading the result to the Internet Archive. “With this project now complete,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Feb 2021

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

The Records of Congregationalists of Color

Under the project title of “New England’s Hidden Histories,” the Congregational Library and Archives has been digitizing the records of early churches and related documents. The library has just announced the publication of a finding...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2021

Why SF hasn’t prepared us to imagine machine learning.

The models produced by machine learning aren't much like the AI in science fiction. But they do strongly resemble the Library of Babel. Continue reading →
From: The Stone and The Shell on 2 Feb 2021

“News Media” Institute for Teachers at A.A.S., 26-31 July

Last summer, the American Antiquarian Society had planned a weeklong National Endowment for the Humanities Institute for educators. And then the pandemic began, and by fall the government had let it get out of control.The A.A.S. has therefore rescheduled...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jan 2021

Manuscript Transcription in Your Own Home

This evening at 5:00 P.M., the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture is hosting an online workship titled “Making History thru Handwriting: An Introduction to Manuscript Transcription.”Julie A. Fisher from the American...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jan 2021

Warren on “America’s First Veterans,” 13 Jan.

On Wednesday, 13 January, the American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati will offer an online talk by executive director Jack D. Warren, Jr., about the new book America’s First Veterans.The institute’s announcement says:...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2021

The Adventures of a Steel Dress Sword

I’ve been discussing myths of Frederick the Great’s admiration for George Washington—claims that he had the highest praise for the Continental Army’s maneuvers around Trenton and that he sent the American general a picture of himself...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jan 2021

Digital Databases to Stay Home For

Here are four digital resources that caught my attention over the past few months. The British Library has digitized George III’s Topographical Library and put the scans on Flickr, each linked back to its own catalogue for full information. There...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Dec 2020

When John Piemont Set Up Shop in Danvers

At the website of the Danvers Archival Center, part of the town’s public library, Richard B. Trask shared his essay “Discovering Paul Revere in the Dried Prunes Box,” also published decades ago in Family Heritage. It involves the engraved...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Dec 2020

Jane Austen, Regency Circulating Libraries, and Enterprise, Part 1 — Vic Sanborn

“They who buy books do not read them, and … they who read them do not buy them.” – Robert Southey Introduction: Circulating libraries benefited Jane Austen and authors of her era in two ways. They rented out books, pamphlets,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Oct 2020

Making the most of the reading room

This post is part of a series I have written arising from my British Academy SRG, where I have been thinking about the processes and practicalities of doing research in rare books rooms. It was planned pre-pandemic, and so some of the detail for...
From: Early Modern France on 26 Aug 2020

Sara’s essential reading room kit

This is part of a series arising from my British Academy SRG project on pamphlet reprinting and copying during the French Wars of Religion.  Working in a rare books room for the first time can be a rather overwhelming experience. Rare books...
From: Early Modern France on 26 Aug 2020

Planning a research trip – before I go

This post is part of a series about preparing for and undertaking research trips in rare books rooms and libraries which arises from a British Academy Small Research Grant I held between 2017 and 2020. I will mainly be talking about French libraries,...
From: Early Modern France on 25 Aug 2020

Working in rare books rooms – some (partly pre-pandemic) thoughts.

The great joy of my research is that I have been able to work with rare books collections all over France and further afield. When I started my latest project on provincial reprinting of pamphlets during the French Wars of Religion, I decided I would...
From: Early Modern France on 25 Aug 2020

The Point of a John Adams Presidential Library

As I noted yesterday, earlier this year Mayor Thomas Koch of Quincy raised the idea of moving John Adams’s books from the Boston Public Library, where they’ve been for a century and a quarter, to his city. That was part of an ambitious speech...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Aug 2020

Looking at John Adams’s Things Today

Since the Boston Public Library opened in its current location in 1895, it’s been the repository of John Adams’s book collection.The B.P.L. had a handsome exhibit of those books in 2006-07, as shown here, courtesy of Brian O’Connor....
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Aug 2020

“The most appropriate and useful place for the collection”

Yesterday I quoted John Adams’s deed donating his library to the town of Quincy. The former President also granted the town some of the land he owned to build an academy, where the library was supposed to go, and a new Congregational church.In February...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Aug 2020

When John Adams Gave Away His Library

In the summer of 1822, John Adams was feeling generous toward his home town and considering his legacy. The ex-President was then eighty-six years old.On 25 June, Adams deeded to the town of Quincy two tracts of land to fund a stone “Temple”...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.