The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Lifestyle found 116 posts

From sailing serenely on the Sirena – to a new book about Gin…

I tend not to post blogs saying that I am away from home in case nefarious people in the neighbourhood take it upon themselves to pay my home a visit. So, instead I will recount a splendid recent Trans-Atlantic cruise on board the Oceania’s ship...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 30 Nov 2022

Elegant Dining with the Lees

Not THAT Lee. And not at his plantation. And not actually at Stratford Hall. No rustle of silk, silver platters from the kitchen, obsequious... The post Elegant Dining with the Lees appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Christmas Day: A Soldier’s Holiday?

Soldiers’ celebrations depended on circumstances, personal beliefs, and family or community traditions. David DeSimone notes in his article “Another Look at Christmas in the... The post Christmas Day: A Soldier’s Holiday? appeared first on Journal...

‘Keeping Within Compass’ – from Colonial Williamsburg to teapots and pubs.

In February I am privileged to be invited back to Colonial Williamsburg to give a talk to fit in with the theme of virtue and vice, as part of their week-long 74th Annual Antiques Forum. Their promotional material for the seminar features a coloured mezzotint...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 12 Dec 2021

John Adams’s Love of Cider

It is not exactly a secret that John Adams was a fan of cider. The Massachusetts-born second President’s love of the drink has been... The post John Adams’s Love of Cider appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A taste of Italy and a cornucopia of delicacies to be found in the Strand

It is easy to think of William Hogarth as an artist and satirist and to forget that he earned his bread and butter doing mundane things like drawing trade cards for local businesses. One example is this one for Mrs Holt’s emporium, which stocked all...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 17 Aug 2021

6th July – a date for the history books. (What do you mean, ‘It’s not cricket’?)

On 26 July 1745 twenty-two ladies gathered in a field on Gosden Common near Guildford. Half of them – the maids of  Hambledon – wore red ribbons around their hats; the other eleven, from Bramley, were bedecked with blue ribbons in their high hats....
From: Georgian Gentleman on 26 Jul 2021

WEIGHTS & MEASURES – and a bit of decimalisation as well. Kelvin will be pleased….

Simon Stevin, in many ways the Father of Decimalisation. I was intrigued to see that someone at Oxford University is suggesting that our use of Imperial measurements (feet and inches, pounds and ounces etc) should be re-considered because of their links...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 17 May 2021

“Spirits of Independence”: Ten Taverns of the Revolutionary War Era

City Tavern in Philadelphia is a reconstruction of the famous eighteenth century tavern where countless patriots—both political and military—met throughout the American Revolution, and... The post “Spirits of Independence”: Ten...

Daylight Saving – and the ingenious Dr Benjamin Franklin

Image courtesy of David Cohen, Unsplash To mark the fact that the clocks changed last night, a look at one of the ideas which triggered the whole question of daylight saving – a letter to the editor of The Journal of Paris dated 1784, from no less...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 28 Mar 2021

A dance through time, with Ignatius Sancho as your guide.

Portrait of Ignatius Sancho, by Thomas Gainsborough, 1768, courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery of Canada 14 December 2020 marked the 240th anniversary of the death of the remarkable Ignatius Sancho. I have blogged about him before: he was ...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 23 Dec 2020

After effects of the first Gin Act – riots, Puss & Mew shops and the enterprising Captain Dudley Bradstreet

Detail from a caricature by Richard Newton, courtesy of the Lewis Walpole Library at Yale. In 1729 the government decided to try and do ‘something’ about the social ills known nowadays as the Gin Craze. The result was the first Gin Act, passed...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 20 Dec 2020

Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?

This month, we asked our contributors: With many different holidays and celebrations approaching, what is your favorite beverage known to have been consumed during... The post Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?...

More lavatorial humour: Gillray and his fellow caricaturists and a view of ‘convenience’

Sawney in the Boghouse. © The Trustees of the British Museum The recent guest post by Naomi featured a print showing a Scotsman mis-using a close-stool or convenience. The original came out in 1745, just before the Jacobite uprising, and was at a...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 19 Aug 2020

Always use due Diligence …. riding the dilly from Paris to Lyons.

Back in 1989 the French postal service issued a stamp featuring  the French version of our stage coach, called a diligence – or ‘dilly’ as it was  sometimes referred to. I only know about it because I inserted the words ‘Grand...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 10 Jul 2020

A high flyer, a harlot, a driving lesson, a poor piglet and a pub: a lesson westward.

The Bell & Anchor public house at 38-40 Hammersmith Road was closed and demolished in the 1970s to make way for the lorry park at London’s Olympia. I only mention it because it was a well-known watering hole 200 years earlier, when it appears...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 7 Jun 2020

Inside a Milliners Shop – a morning ramble.

At present I am researching milliner’s shops in the 1780s – an esoteric subject, I appreciate, but one which is fascinating. It is part of my research into the life of an actress who will be featured in my next-book-but-one, on whores, harlots...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 19 May 2020

Tea in 18th Century America

Tea in 18th Century America by Kimberly K. Walters. (K. Walters at the Sign of the Gray Horse, 2019) Best-selling author Lucinda Brant offers enthusiastic... The post Tea in 18th Century America appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century Cookery

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and managing editor of the Journal of the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist, about the fascinating... The post This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day 5

Martha Bradley lived in an age when a prosperous household often brewed its own beer, culturing and storing it in large wooden vessels in... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The British Housewife</i>, Day 5 appeared first...

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