The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Liverpool"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Liverpool found 26 posts

How Eighteenth-Century Governments Worked | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research interests include the popular literature of the period c.1750–c.1850. Introduction I recently had the pleasure of revisiting John W. Derry’s Politics...

October 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Staffordshire and Liverpool WARE-HOUSE In KING-STREET.” Ebenezer Bridgham launched a regional advertising campaign for his “Staffordshire and Liverpool WARE-HOUSE In...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Oct 2021

Bath 250 A Virtual Conference: Watch streaming videos for 2 weeks

Bath 250: A Virtual Conference to Mark The 250th Anniversary of the New Assembly Rooms at Bath – 29th & 30th September 2021 Streaming videos of all panels are now online for the next 2 wks, courtesy of @mbayliss90. They are:   Welcome & keynote...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Oct 2021

September 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Staffordshire and Liverpool Ware House, In King Stret BOSTON.” As summer turned to fall in 1771, Ebenezer Bridgham, the proprietor of the “Staffordshire and Liverpool...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Sep 2021

September 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Sell at least as low as they were ever sold on the Continent of America.” Some merchants and shopkeepers named their businesses after the signs that marked their locations,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Sep 2021

July 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Now Selling very Cheap.” In the decades prior to the American Revolution, purveyors of goods and services regularly incorporated appeals to price into their advertisements. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jul 2021

Mapping a polycentric Republic of Letters in eighteenth-century Mexico

Map of Mexico or New Spain (1708), by Herman Moll. (Wikimedia Commons) The viceroyalty of New Spain – whose territory largely corresponded to that of present-day Mexico – was, during the eighteenth century, the most important...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 May 2021

The Digitizing Enlightenment ‘twitterstorm’ of 3 August

This past week our publication partner, Liverpool University Press, shipped out copies of Digitizing Enlightenment: digital humanities and the transformation of eighteenth-century studies, edited by Simon Burrows and Glenn Roe, the July volume of Oxford...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 13 Aug 2020

Digitization of the Enlightenment and Manifold Scholarship

Last month, Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment released the first volume in the long history of the series that is devoted to the application of digital humanities methods to the study of eighteenth-century intellectual life, Networks...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Jul 2019

A Year in Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment

As LUP continues to celebrate its 120-year anniversary, this month we are focusing on the eighteenth century and the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series, published in partnership with one of our Partner Presses, the Voltaire Foundation....
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Jul 2019

The Liverpool tribute to Roscoe

Title: The Liverpool tribute to Roscoe : verbatim reports of the addresses delivered at the Roscoe Festival, held in Liverpool, March 8, 1853; also the proceedings at the opening of the Derby Museum, and the Mayor’s soiree, held on the same...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Dec 2018

Othello and the Everyman

By Kelsey Ridge, the Shakespeare Institute. Golda Rosheuvel as Othello – Photograph by Jonathan Keenan I was drawn to Gemma Bodinetz’s Othello at Liverpool’s Everyman largely for its high-concept approach: Othello (played by Golda Rosheuvel)...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Jun 2018

Over the next hill

Langden Brook, Trough of Bowland By Alexander P Kapp, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13402669 When your wheels are burning up the miles and you’re wearing down shoe leather, When your face is frozen in a smile and...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 8 Jan 2018

Audiences, Immigration and Belonging in Elizabethan Theatres: Putting the archive into performance

Who visited the Elizabethan playhouses? What did it mean to have non-English characters being played on stage? What does dramatic engagement with issues of immigration, identity, and belonging tell us about sixteenth-century theatre? Earlier this month...
From: Before Shakespeare on 1 Dec 2017

North West Early Modern Seminar in Liverpool

I recently attended the latest meeting of the North West Early Modern Seminar Series, which was held at Liverpool University on 1 November.  It came at the end of a particularly busy few days for me, so I was really quite tired, but happily there...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 18 Nov 2017

Audiences, Immigration, and Belonging: Strangers in Finsbury

On the 19th November 2017, the TIDE project and Before Shakespeare are hosting a workshop exploring the diverse audiences of Elizabethan playhouses and their surrounding neighbourhoods, based at the University of Liverpool’s London campus, 33 Finsbury...
From: Before Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2017

The Prince of Wales’ visit to Liverpool in September 1806

During the autumn of 1806, the Prince of Wales (later George IV) and his brother William, Duke of Clarence (later William IV), undertook a tour of several of the counties of England. We are going to look at just one of their destinations today, their...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Sep 2017

November news

Last Friday saw the publication of my first full length, peer-reviewed article, Verse Epitaphs and the Memorialisation of Women in Reformation England, commissioned by Liz Oakley-Brown when she was editor of the Renaissance section of Literature Compass. ...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 7 Nov 2016

Play Review – The Chamber of Beheaded Queens (2016) by K T Parker, dir. Kate O’Leary

The Chamber of Beheaded Queens is a distinctly feminised historical fantasy. It depicts an afterlife where Anne Boleyn, Mary Stuart, Catherine Howard and Marie-Antoinette share their experiences of the cruel men who beheaded them. The chamber...
From: Hobbinol's Blog on 10 Apr 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.