The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Loyalism"

Your search for posts with tags containing Loyalism found 19 posts

Land Grants, Religious Exemptions, and Aid on the Ground: The Role of Local Government in the Resettlement of Loyalist Refugees after the American Revolution

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Alexandra Mairs-Kessler                        ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Jan 2021

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

Women Also Know Loyalists

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part two of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on new directions in loyalist studies. In the first part, Professors Brannon, Duval, and Tillman discussed...
From: Borealia on 6 May 2020

Women Also Know Revolution

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part one of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on the political agency and experiences of women. In the second part, Brannon, Duval, and Tillman turn their...
From: Borealia on 4 May 2020

The Consequences of Loyalism

The Consequences of Loyalism: Essays in Honor of Robert M. Calhoon edited by Rebecca Brannon and Joseph S. Moore (University of South Carolina Press, 2019)... The post The Consequences of Loyalism appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Community of Suffering: The Robie Women in Loyalist Halifa

G. Patrick O’Brien Having spent an agreeable New Year’s Eve with her friends, nineteen-year-old Mary Robie paused to write in her diary before turning in for the night. “Which brings 1783 to a period,” she began, “I have...
From: Borealia on 8 Jan 2018

Britishness and Whiteness in Early Canadian Culture

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy In the September 28, 2017 issue of the New York Review of Books, Fintan O’Toole explained Brexit as the consequence of a rebirth of English nationalism: “Brexit is a peaceful revolution but it is unmistakably a nationalist...
From: Borealia on 23 Oct 2017

Loyalist Women and the Fight for the Right to Entry

By Kacy Tillman After traveling over 1,000 miles, I arrived on the front stoop of the loyalist Grace Growden Galloway’s home with my guide, Beth. The tenant who lived in the mansion would not let us in. She had already slammed the door on us once...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Mar 2016

“Overlooked”? A loyalist historian from Canada responds to American scholars

Bonnie Huskins This dapper fellow is known colloquially as “Loyalist Man.” He welcomes tourists to the Reversing Falls attraction in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada and until a few years ago, sat on the highway welcoming drivers into the...
From: Borealia on 8 Mar 2016

Let’s Play Again: Recovering “The Losers” of the American Revolution (Part I)

Taylor Stoermer Much has been made lately of the rediscovery of the American Revolution by scholars as a series of questions that remain unresolved.  Both veteran historians and those new to the field (although those groups aren’t mutually...
From: Borealia on 8 Feb 2016

Violence in Early Canada

Elizabeth Mancke & Scott See In the months since the 19 October election, Canadians – from Justin Trudeau to church groups preparing for Syrian refugees – are reasserting one of the most recognizable tropes about Canada, that the country...
From: Borealia on 1 Feb 2016

Loyalists in the Classroom: Students reflect on historical sources

This response to Christopher Minty’s post on Loyalist Sources was composed collectively by the students of History 3403, a course at the University of New Brunswick devoted specifically to the Loyalists of the American Revolution. Their comments...
From: Borealia on 11 Dec 2015

The Future of Loyalist Studies

Christopher F. Minty “Intractable issues vex loyalist studies.” These were the words Ruma Chopra used in an essay, published in History Compass, in 2013. She’s right. As of mid-2015, loyalist studies has come to an important juncture,...
From: Borealia on 23 Nov 2015

Local and Atlantic Sociability: Military Engineer William Booth

Bonnie Huskins William Booth, an 18th-century British military engineer, was a citizen of the Atlantic World.[1] He was posted to various locations throughout the British Empire, beginning in Gibraltar in 1774, where he was eventually promoted to Director...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2015

The Week in Early American History

We have an abundance of links for your Sunday morning reading pleasure. Read on, fellow early Americanists: On the heels of Thanksgiving, The New Republic reprinted a 1920 Charles Beard essay on the pilgrims with the headline: “The Best Hit Piece...
From: The Junto on 8 Dec 2013

Guest Post: The Problem of Loyalism before the American Revolution

Guest poster Christopher Minty, a PhD candidate at the University of Stirling, explores the complexity of pre-independence loyalism.
From: The Junto on 11 Sep 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.