The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Loyalist"

Showing 1 - 20 of 382

Your search for posts with tags containing Loyalist found 382 posts

The Outlaw Cornelius Hatfield: Loyalist Partisan of the American Revolution

The war for all practical purposes was over when hostilities ended with a cease fire negotiated by the Americans, British, French, and Spanish in... The post The Outlaw Cornelius Hatfield: Loyalist Partisan of the American Revolution appeared first on...

The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 178

In September 1780, writing from Hillsborough, North Carolina, just one month after the disastrous defeat at Camden, Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates penned a disconcerted... The post The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

The Long History of the Faneuil Hall Name

Boston’s Faneuil Hall is different from most other landmarks and monuments bearing slaveholders’ names because in most cases those sites arose from a later generation choosing to honor a person.Sometimes that act is meant to elevate a local...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Sep 2020

“Poor are the Boston-Poor indeed”

In May 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage arrived in Boston with the news that he was the new royal governor and that Parliament had ordered the port closed to most shipping. Anticipating increased unemployment, the town of Boston began what we’d call public-works...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2020

“It was a very unfortunate time to preach a sermon”

The Rev. Jonathan Mayhew insisted that, even though his sermon on 25 Sept 1765 decried the Stamp Act, Bostonians couldn’t have taken that as encouragement to riot against royal officials.But crowds did riot the following night, and in particular...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2020

“As if I approved of such proceedings”

On Tuesday, 27 August, the day after a mob destroyed Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s house, some people blamed the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew’s latest sermon.In his history of Massachusetts, Hutchinson wrote the sermon had implied “approbation...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Aug 2020

Minorcans, New Smyrna, and the American Revolution in East Florida

Beyond Florida’s state boundaries the history of New Smyrna is seldom mentioned.[1] Well known to the locals of New Smyrna Beach, the region’s settlement by... The post Minorcans, New Smyrna, and the American Revolution in East Florida...

“Brethren, ye have been called unto liberty”

In 1765, 25 August was a Sunday, so the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached a sermon at the West Meetinghouse in Boston. Mayhew was one of the town’s most radical ministers in two ways:Though a strong Congregationalist, he leaned theologically toward...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Aug 2020

Pirates of the American Revolution in the Chesapeake Bay: Joseph Wheland Jr. and the Loyalist Picaroons

By Jamie L. H. Goodall The American Revolution is often viewed through a loyalist vs. rebel/revolutionary lens. On the one hand, there were the proud, patriotic American colonists, and on the other hand an oppressive and cruel king. Among the Americans...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 Aug 2020

Countervailing Colonial Perspectives on Quartering the British Army

In the years leading up to the Revolutionary War, as the British Army repositioned its forces from western frontier posts into American cities, many... The post Countervailing Colonial Perspectives on Quartering the British Army appeared first on Journal...

Paula Bagger with More on Marlborough

After my series of postings about Revolutionary conflict in Marlborough, Paula Bagger of the Hingham Historical Society filled me in on some details about the household of Loyalist merchant Henry Barnes. She has researched that family in the course of...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Aug 2020

A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife

It may have been Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s patriotic paean that belatedly canonized a heroic horseman as a key figure of the American Revolution, but... The post A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife appeared first on Journal...

The Life and Death of Nathaniel Rogers

Nathaniel Rogers was born in Boston in 1737. His mother was a sister of Thomas Hutchinson, who later that year was chosen to be both a selectman and the town’s representative to the Massachusetts General Court.Young Natty was orphaned as a small...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Aug 2020

Getting Out of Marlborough in 1775

When we left Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere, they were in a back room of Henry Barnes’s house in Marlborough, listening as he tried to send away a member of the local committee of correspondence.Dr. Samuel Curtis had shown up that...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jul 2020

The Travels of Arthur Bowler, Rhode Island Loyalist

Over on the Small State, Big History blog, Jane Lancaster has published an article titled “Should They Stay or Should They Go?: Rhode Island Black Loyalists after the American Revolution.” Lancaster draws on “The Book of Negroes,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jul 2020

The Speakman Brothers at War

When we left the Barnes and Speakman families in Marlborough in the fall of 1770, they appear to have arrived at some sort of truce.Henry Barnes continued to run a potash manufactory and general store. Older brother William Speakman probably managed the...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jul 2020

Family Business and Politics in Marlborough

Personal finance and politics intersected for the Speakman family and their neighbors in the summer of 1770.As I started to discuss back here, Thomas Speakman acquired property in Marlborough before being killed on the Lake Champlain battlefront in 1757.His...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jul 2020

“A Letter was left by some unknown Person”

In 1770, the Boston town meeting named Henry Barnes as one of a small group of businesspeople who were openly defying the town’s non-importation agreement.Barnes was unusual in that group because his shop and main business were off in rural Marlborough,...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2020

An Effigy on Horseback in Marlborough

When we left merchant Henry Barnes sometimes in June 1770, his Marlborough neighbors had just hanged him in effigy.A letter from Marlborough dated 20 July and published in Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette for 30 July gave some Whiggish townspeople’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.