The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Ludwig"

Your search for posts with tags containing Ludwig found 18 posts

Literary Review: The Musical Human by Michael Spitzer; A Life in Music by Nicholas Kenyon

The first note known to have sounded on Earth was an E natural. It was produced some 165 million years ago by a katydid, a kind of cricket, rubbing its wings together – a fact deduced by scientists from the insect’s remains, preserved in amber. Consider...
From: Mathew Lyons on 3 Jun 2021

Thomas Edison's Lady Glassblower

 Fig. 1. Sealing the Glass Socket andCarbon Filament into the Flask of an Incandescent Lamp."We will next turn to the glass-blowing department, wherehundreds of girls are employed in all the delicate and skillful manipulations involved...
From: Conciatore on 19 Oct 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Three

We begin the third part of George’s life in March 1794, but just in case you missed the earlier parts, click on the highlighted links to read part 1 and part two . George had been busy studying and performing at the New Theatre Royal, still under...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Sep 2020

Thomas Edison's Lady Glassblowers

Fig. 1. Sealing the Glass Socket andCarbon Filament into the Flask of an Incandescent Lamp."We will next turn to the glass-blowing department, wherehundreds of girls are employed in all the delicate and skillful manipulations involved in the...
From: Conciatore on 4 Mar 2020

Thomas Edison's Lady Glassblowers

Fig. 1. Sealing the Glass Socket andCarbon Filament into the Flask of an Incandescent Lamp."We will next turn to the glass-blowing department, wherehundreds of girls are employed in all the delicate and skillful manipulations involved in the...
From: Conciatore on 4 Nov 2019

Thomas Edison's Lady Glassblowers

Fig. 1. Sealing the Glass Socket andCarbon Filament into the Flask of an Incandescent Lamp."We will next turn to the glass-blowing department, wherehundreds of girls are employed in all the delicate and skillful manipulations involved in the...
From: Conciatore on 8 Mar 2019

Thomas Edison's Lady Glassblowers

Fig. 1. Sealing the Glass Socket and Carbon Filament into the Flask of an Incandescent Lamp."We will next turn to the glass-blowing department, wherehundreds of girls are employed in all the delicate and skillful manipulations involved in the...
From: Conciatore on 12 Sep 2018

Improvement and Enlightenment

A recent invitation to talk to the Enlightenment Workshop of the Voltaire Foundation prompted me to consider the ways in which some modes of thinking common during the Enlightenment might have been inherited – directly or indirectly – from...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Mar 2018

The Legend of Molly Pitcher—A New Source

Since I was on a Battle of Monmouth kick, I’ll jump to one of the most enduring American legends to come out of that fight: Molly Pitcher. As Ray Raphael wrote in Founding Myths and this article for the Journal of the American Revolution, there’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Aug 2016

Report on ‘Shadows and Sandmen: Or, Things that Go CRECS in the Night’, 26 Oct 2015

All was silent in the Arts and Social Studies Library … until this year’s first CRECS event, ‘Shadows & Sandmen: Things that go CRECS in the night’, brought Gothic Romanticism into the, thankfully brightly lit, room. Keith...
From: CRECS// on 3 Nov 2015

Our first 2015/16 event—Shadows and Sandmen—is on tomorrow!

Filed under: Events Tagged: art, ETA Hoffmann, fiction, Germany, ghost stories, gothic, literature, Ludwig van Beethoven, Mary Shelley, maternity, music, nineteenth century, performance, Romanticism
From: CRECS// on 25 Oct 2015

First event—Shadows and Sandmen: Or, Things that Go CRECS in the Night, 26 Oct 2015

Our first CRECS event will celebrate Halloween week in spooktacular style. We’ll be kicking the 2015/16 programme off with an exploration of the nineteenth-century gothic literature and music. The Romantic period saw the emergence of the first...
From: CRECS// on 15 Oct 2015

CRECS Autumn 2015 programme now available

We’re delighted to announce the new CRECS programme for the forthcoming session. Below, you’ll find details of the Autumn 2015 session: the Spring 2016 session will follow in due course. All events take places in Cardiff University’s Special...
From: CRECS// on 9 Oct 2015

The Future of Learning Shakespeare

By Folger Education   We’re lucky to have four fabulous summer interns with us at Folger Education—not just because they’re working hard to support our gazillion projects, but because they’re making sharp observations about...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 30 Jun 2015

The Hessian Jägerkorps in New York and Pennsylvania, 1776-1777

In December 1775, British Colonel William Faucitt and Hessian minister Martin Ernst von Schlieffen drafted a treaty promising the Hessian Landgraf Friedrich II a large sum of money in return for soldiers.[1] The British had spent the fall of 1775 offering...

An ABC of Shady Figures on the Medical Marketplace: ‘A’ for ‘Alchemist’ and ‘C’ for ‘Chymist’

This Italian mountebank is depicted as impressing the audience with his snake-handling. As part of a description of the Medical Polity (1638) of his day, Ludwig von Hörnigk (1600–67) included a lengthy chapter on all sorts of shady figures that competed...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 10 Jul 2013

Available Today: How To Teach Your Children Shakespeare!

~by Ken Ludwig Today is the publication date of my new book, How To Teach Your Children Shakespeare (Random House Publishing), and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to share this book with you as parents and educators, arts advocates and fellow Shakespeare...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 11 Jun 2013

How To Teach Your Children Shakespeare

by Ken Ludwig Since my early teens, I’ve felt strongly about Shakespeare—about the value of studying and memorizing significant passages by the greatest writer who ever lived—but it wasn’t until I became a father that I figured out how to share...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 16 May 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.