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Search Results for "Luther"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Luther found 51 posts

Don Giovanni in Flanders

 Spanish attack on a Flemish village,Attr:  Pieter Snayers. (click to enlarge)In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp, possibly the most productive period of his...
From: Conciatore on 18 Dec 2020

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #

Yesterday, I set out to convince you why reading and writing historical fiction set in Renaissance France was a worthwhile endeavor. The first reason I offered was ESCAPE from the turbulence of our present situation. Today, I offer a second reason: RELEVANCE.Reason...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 25 Sep 2020

Winter School: Archival Research Skills and Book History, 2-3rd December, University of Limerick

The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Limerick, presents the 2nd Winter School in Archival Research Skills & Book History 2nd – 3rd December 2019 Supported by the AHSS Teaching Board   Venue: University of Limerick, Glucksman Library...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Nov 2019

Can I have it both ways?

Today is Halloween; today is Reformation Day, the day that Martin Luther posted—or otherwise “published”— his Ninety-five Theses, a scathing and immediately-accessible critique of the abuses of the Catholic Church which...
From: streets of salem on 31 Oct 2019

British Society for the History of Philosophy Annual Conference

Registration deadline: 31 March 2019Key InformationLocation: King's College London, Strand Campus, LondonDates: Wednesday 24 April - Friday 26 April 2019Contact: bshp2019@kcl.ac.ukThe BSHP gratefully acknowledges support from King’s College London...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 24 Apr 2019

Din Giovanni in Flanders

Spanish attack on a Flemish village,Attr:  Pieter Snayers. (click to enlarge)In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp, possibly the most productive period of his career....
From: Conciatore on 11 Jun 2018

Performing Reformation Ballads in Manchester

The end of October was very busy, what with several Historical Association meetings in London as well as two public engagements.  The first of these was a speaking engagement at Ewecross, but the second was something a bit different – a 45...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 14 Dec 2017

Erasmus on the Arts in Luther’s Reformation: A Tragedy

By Kirk Essary, The University of Western Australia The arts had affective import for Erasmus on multiple levels. The emotions themselves are described by the Dutch humanist in categories derived from the ars rhetorica, and according to the genres of...
From: Histories of Emotion on 10 Nov 2017

Forest Spirits and Dull Stories: Toleration as Governing Emotion in Seventeenth-Century Finland

By Raisa Maria Toivo, University of Tampere In 1675, a church visitation was held at Kesälahti, a parish located in the county of Kexholm at the eastern border of Finland, which had been annexed to Sweden from Russia in 1618 and had set the stage...
From: Histories of Emotion on 3 Nov 2017

Luther and England’s Long Reformation

Today is the 500th anniversary of an event that may never have happened, but which may as well have. Sometimes, what really matters in history is not what really happened, but what people have said about it. This is true in my own area of interest, the...
From: wartsandbrawls on 31 Oct 2017

The importance of image: Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

Greg Copeland’s painting of Martin Luther It’s one of the most famous of images: a simply dressed monk takes a hammer and nails, the symbols of the crucifixion of Christ, and fixes a large document to the wooden door of a church. The date...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 Oct 2017

Reformation 500: Luther autograph on display

Alexander Peplow A Commonplace Reformation: Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Add. A. 92 – Martin Luther’s Autograph Collection of Proverbs Bodleian Library MS Add. A. 92. Photo: Alexander Peplow. Reproduced with permission of the Bodleian Libraries...
From: The Conveyor on 27 Oct 2017

Don Giovanni in Flanders

Spanish attack on a Flemish village, Attr:  Pieter Snayers. (click to enlarge) In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp, possibly the most productive period of his career....
From: Conciatore on 10 Jul 2017

The Faith of William Shakespeare

The Faith of William Shakespeare: a one-day conferenceSaturday 20 May from 10.00am to 5.00pm, the Wolfson Hall, The Shakespeare Centre, Henley Street. By Rev. Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Imagine the world into...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 14 Apr 2017

Exhibition on the Reformation in the Long Room, Trinity College Dublin

‘Power and Belief: The Reformation at 500’ is on display from 1-28 February in the Long Room, Trinity College Dublin. The exhibition includes Martin Luther’s translation of the Old Testament (1523) and William Bedell’s work...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 6 Feb 2017

A few thoughts on Martin Luther

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the reformation. On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther made his name by nailing his 95 theses to the door of Wittenberg church. This simple act of criticism represented something bigger than one monk with an axe to grind....
From: Sixteenth Century Scholars on 19 Jan 2017

Plotting Revolution, Part III: Histories of the Present

By Nathan Perl-Rosenthal We live in the world that the age of revolutions created.  The institutions and the myths it originated still structure the political life of most of the world’s people. So when we tell the story of the revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Jan 2017

Luther, the Great Disruptor

Was it just me or was the word disruption used intensively in the closing months of 2016? It seems like every time I turned on the radio or picked up the newspaper I was confronted with that word. Now that the year has turned to 2017, my...
From: streets of salem on 3 Jan 2017

Keeping Christmas

Well, after all that immersion into Puritan anti-Christmas tracts I was doubting my own Christmas observances–powerful stuff! I’m pretty Protestant in my religious sentiments (though raised Episcopalian—on the fence) so there is something...
From: streets of salem on 23 Dec 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.