The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Mansfield Park"

Your search for posts with tags containing Mansfield Park found 11 posts

The Curious Incident in Austen’s Emma By Clyve Rose

Inquiring readers, This fascinating post written by author Clyve Rose explains to film viewers who have not read Emma the short, confusing scene shown in Autumn de Wilde’s 2020 film adaptation of Austen’s novel. Ms. Rose reviews the history...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Aug 2020

Review of Visuality in the Novels of Austen, Radcliffe, Edgeworth and Burney by Jessica A. Volz

Inquiring readers, My apologies to author Jessica Volz–who contacted me weeks before the COVID-19 lockdown about her book–for posting this review several months late. She has been so patient that I must thank her for her graciousness. The...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 May 2020

Visiting Stoneleigh Abbey, by Rachel Dodge

On a visit to see my relatives in Warwick, England, last month, I stopped at Stoneleigh Abbey. It was late in the day and the house tours had concluded, so I purchased a garden ticket and stepped through the wide, low door from the Gatehouse into the...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 Sep 2018

Austen and the Anthropocene

“Jane Austen Populaire 3” (2016) by Eymery. Wikimedia Commons. Modern adaptations of Jane Austen’s works rarely emphasize climate change.  The intrigues of Austen’s protagonists are capacious enough to accommodate murder mysteries,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 23 Jan 2018

Shakespeare and Jane Austen

Jane Austen Before 2017 comes to an end, it’s appropriate to mark it as the two-hundredth anniversary of the death of literary giant and Shakespeare-lover Jane Austen. She died, aged only 41, in 1817, in Winchester. Her admiration of Shakespeare...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Dec 2017

Mansfield Park, Indianapolis Opera

Indianapolis Opera invites us to join them for the American Premiere of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, March 18-20, 2016. The performances will be at the Schrott Center for the Arts on the campus of Butler University. Information about tickets, showtimes...
From: Jane Austen's World on 5 Mar 2016

Jane Austen Summer Program Presents: “Mansfield Park & Its Afterlives”

June 16 to 19, 2016.  Hosted by the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and the Jane Austen Society of North America-North Carolina.   This summer, more than 100 people, including Austen fans, established scholars, graduate students, K-12...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 10 Feb 2016

Regency Fashion: Keeping Hems Clean

During the late 18th century, early 19th century, trains on gowns were de rigueur. I chose to show the two gowns below, since the styles were popular when Jane Austen was a teenager (first image) and wrote the first editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Apr 2014

Georgian Britain: Legacies of British Slave Ownership

Inquiring readers, this rather serious topic of British slave ownership plays a role in Jane Austen’s world and her novels. She addressed the issue in an indirect way in Mansfield Park and Emma, with the Bertram fortune resting on slave trade and...
From: Jane Austen's World on 10 Mar 2013

Maintaining the grounds of a landed British estate: Georgian gardening

Great landed estates were symbols of the owner’s wealth and status in British society. Everything was put on grand display – from the exquisite architecture of the house itself to the furniture, jewels, silver plate, servants, books, carriages,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.