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Search Results for "Manuscripts"

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Out on 5 October with AUP, the result of seven years of dogears and manuscript snippets: Cornelis J. Schilt, Isaac Newton and the Study of Chronology: Prophecy, History, and Method https://www.aup.nl/nl/book/9789048554287/isaac-newton-and-the-study-of-chronology
From: Corpus Newtonicum on 21 Sep 2021

The fragmentary is the norm

In these autumnal days, a return to normality is a fashionable topic — or (as the conversation often goes) perhaps it is the arrival of a new, subtly different, normality. One feature which suggests that times they are a-changing back again is the revival...

Lillias and Sophia Stuart music album

A bound volume of music compiled by Lillias and Sophia Stuart, presumably sisters, with settings for keyboard and voice, the latter often for two singers, written in two distinct hands. The two women have copied here a variety of material, from traditional...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Sep 2021

Memoirs of Theodore Lane

A bound album with “Biographical sketch of the life of Mr. Theodore Lane” (pages [33]-59 from Pierce Egan’s 1831 publication: The show folks! (London : Printed for M. Arnold, 1831)), extra-illustrated with portraits of actors, actors in performances,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 Aug 2021

An Experiment in Following a Worm Through a Folded Letter

A guest post by William Davis   Folger staff have long been interested in folding early modern letters for mailing. It comes up periodically when someone finds a letter with unusual folds. Both Heather Wolfe and Erin Blake have written Collation posts...
From: The Collation on 5 Aug 2021

Common place book 1811 : manuscript

A commonplace book that collects a number of unusual entries on subjects as diverse as an example of a contradictory letter or letter of hatred; a description of an advertisement for a “Fantocini” puppet-show in Lewisham in 1812; the spread of venereal...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Jul 2021

Decoding Early Modern Gossip

A guest post by Alicia Petersen What comes to mind when you think of a coded letter? Political intrigue? Espionage? As the Folger Shakespeare Library’s 2014-5 exhibition Decoding the Renaissance: 500 Years of Codes and Ciphers highlighted, these guesses...
From: The Collation on 8 Jul 2021

Tooke family album of unpublished correspondence

Quarto album, with 29 autograph letters (three being fragments), c. 100 pages in total (some laid in loose); two commonplace manuscripts c. 35 and c. 62 pages; a large fragment of a play c. 90 pages (on rectos only), comprising most of(?) Act II, all...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Jul 2021

A Black Rooster and the Angel of Dread: Jewish Magical Recipes Against Fear

By Andrea Gondos Illness and a desperate longing for wellness and healing defined Jewish magical recipes books, written in a thriving manuscript culture of practical Kabbalah that existed alongside printed works in Jewish communities of East-Central Europe...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Jul 2021

Journal of a tour in the year 1745

An anonymous journal of a tour that begins on May 14th in Warrington, Lancashire and passes through Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Lincoln, Leicester, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Northampton, Buckingham, Oxon, Berkshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Jun 2021

Malicious teaseling: or how a simple reference question got complicated

We had seven excellent answers to the Crocodile, which included an image titled “Malice,” but not the text below it. The general consensus was that the cowering man was winding thread or wool off of a drop spindle. One of the great things about being...
From: The Collation on 2 Jun 2021

A recipe for brioche (knitting)

…a Collation KAL (knit-along). Cast on We built our friendship with knits and purls over coffee in the Folger Tea Room. Sharing patterns, exchanging techniques, and giving fiber recommendations are still staple conversation topics for us seven years...
From: The Collation on 18 May 2021

Ledgers for Durrant estate of Scottow, Norfolk

The first of two extensive manuscript account books from the house, the Day Book records receipts from 22 Sept 1759 (£10,513. 10. 5 1/2) to 1769 (£3820. 5. 1 3/4) and expenses 22 Sept 1759 (£10,341. 6.6.) to 1769 (£3683. 19. 9...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 May 2021

Covetousness

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Apr 2021

Ker’s Pastedowns online

St George’s Day is celebrated in several countries around the globe — Ethiopia, Georgia, Portugal for example. In 2021, there is another reason to consider it a red-letter day: it sees the launch of the online edition of Ker’s Pastedowns...

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

Documenting mistakes in our documentation

If someone points out a typo in an online Finding Aid or a Hamnet catalog record, we gratefully say thank-you, fix it, and (usually) move on.1 Sometimes, though, a big enough mistake has been around for a long enough time that we can’t just move...
From: The Collation on 23 Mar 2021

Documenting mistakes in our documentation

If someone points out a typo in an online Finding Aid or a Hamnet catalog record, we gratefully say thank-you, fix it, and (usually) move on.1 Sometimes, though, a big enough mistake has been around for a long enough time that we can’t...
From: The Collation on 23 Mar 2021

A Missing Link for New College Puddings

By Helga Müllneritsch Almost nothing is known about the creators of the Begbrook Manuscript (AC 1420). It was purchased in the nineteenth century by the collector Daniel Parsons (1811-1887), and his collection was probably given to the Downside Abbey...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2021

Monks Using Astronomical Instruments

The manuscript Ambrosiana H 57 sup. includes two texts on the astrolabe, Philoponus’s as well as an anonymous one from perhaps the late 13th century (though this copy is dated 14th century). Along with these texts are a couple Ptolemaic works and...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2021

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.