The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Margaret Cavendish"

Your search for posts with tags containing Margaret Cavendish found 10 posts

CALL FOR PAPERS: 13th International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference

The Thirteenth International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference 6-9 June 2019, Trondheim, NorwayHOST: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)THEME: Natures, Pictures: Cavendish and Early Modern Science, Technology, and CreativityThe society...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 6 Jun 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Second Annual Early Modern Women Writers' Colloquium (2018)

At the 6th Annual Othello's Island Conference 2018Centre for Visual Arts and Research, Nicosia, Cyprus25 to 27 March 2018Keynote lecture by: Professor David NorbrookFull information at www.othellosisland.wixsite.com/emwwLead Convenors: Dr. Stella Achilleos...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 25 Mar 2018

Cavendish and Hutchinson: Spring 2017 Folger Seminar

In many ways Margaret Cavendish (1623-73) and Lucy Hutchinson (1620-81) make strange bedfellows. One was a royalist and one a republican; one largely indifferent to religion and the other a devoted Calvinist; one an aggressive circulator of her work in...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 3 Feb 2017

Edward Phillips’s bio-bibliography of women in Theatrum Poetarum (1675)

Theatrum Poetarum (1675) is a bio-bibliography of classical, medieval, and early modern poets compiled by Edward Phillips and published by Charles Smith. Although the volume seems to have been printed only once, at least fifty copies are known to survive....
From: RECIRC on 2 Sep 2016

Cavendish and Deshoulières: Women and Philosophy

Johannes Vermeer, Woman Reading a Letter (1663), with a large map in the backgroundAlthough much social pressure worked to confine wealthier early modern women to the household, many crossed borders. They did so directly, by traveling or living...

thestuartkings: William and Margaret Cavendish, the Duke and...

thestuartkings: William and Margaret Cavendish, the Duke and Duchess of Newcastle in the Garden of Rubens in Antwerp 1650 By Gonzales Coques

Shakespeare’s first female critic: Margaret Cavendish

Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, is one of the less well-known early commentators on Shakespeare, yet her “Sociable Letter” on Shakespeare, published in 1664, is “the first critical essay ever to be published on Shakespeare”....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Jul 2013

Coming Soon: Shawn Moore on Margaret Cavendish

The Six Degrees of Francis Bacon (SDFB) team is delighted to introduce in the coming days the first in an occasional series in which we invite early modernists with expert knowledge about particular groups and figures to reflect on ways SDFB might aid...
From: Six Degrees of Francis Bacon on 20 Jun 2013

The Rogue Scholar Salon Presents: Jennifer Roberts

Reblogged from bschillace: Welcome back to the Rogue Scholar Salon! Companion to the Dose and Reboot, the RS Salon (and attendant ‘seal of approval’) supports those scholars working outside their ‘official’ disciplines. It's an increasingly inter-disciplinary...
From: Out of Time on 2 Apr 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.