The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Mars"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Mars found 111 posts

The Wedding Goose

We came across this article, accidentally, as you do, and with our arguably warped sense of humour we found the wedding story somewhat amusing, so after much deliberation (well not much, if we’re being honest), we thought we would share it with...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Sep 2019

Irish Renaissance Seminar – Marsh’s Library and UCD

“Early Modern Science and its Boundaries” The 22nd meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar will be held in Marsh’s Library, St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, and hosted by UCD English on Saturday 12th October 2019. Schedule 1.30pm...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 2 Sep 2019

June 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (June 23, 1769). “FREE and ACCEPTED MASONS … propose to celebrate the FEAST of St. JOHN the Baptist.” Any of the “BRETHREN of the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Jun 2019

Sweet Lixiviation

Salsola Kali plant,used in Mediterranean glassmakingin the 17th century.A long time ago, perhaps as long ago as the Stone Age, our ancestors discovered that mixing water with the ashes from the previous night's fire makes a good washing-up liquid. Not...
From: Conciatore on 31 May 2019

The Glass of Montpellier

Montpellier, France, in the seventeenth century.(Attribution unknown)Montpellier is an old city in southern France. It stands about halfway between Marseille and the Spanish border along the Mediterranean Sea (strategically located slightly inland to...
From: Conciatore on 16 Jan 2019

Quilted Petticoats: worn by all women and useful in more ways than one

Quilted petticoats were an item of clothing that transcended any notions of class or status; they were worn throughout most of the eighteenth-century by all women from nobility down to fish-wives and had a variety of uses. Usually tied at either side...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Nov 2018

Maddock Research Fellowships at the Marsh’s Library, Dublin

The Marsh’s Library in Dublin has Visiting short-term Fellowships (between one week and one month) available. They are particularly interested in encouraging established and emerging scholars who wish to work on topics relating to early modern France....
From: Dissenting Experience on 15 Aug 2018

Lixiviation

Salsola Kali plant,used in Mediterranean glassmakingin the 17th century.A long time ago, perhaps as long ago as the Stone Age, our ancestors discovered that mixing water with the ashes from the previous night's fire makes a good washing-up liquid. Not...
From: Conciatore on 3 Aug 2018

Workshop Theatre of John Marston's 'Antonio's Revenge'

The Playhouse Lab, the Oxford Marston, and The Malone SocietypresentJohn Marston’s Antonio’s Revengea one-day conferenceWorkshop Theatre, University of Leeds – Saturday, 7 July 2018This one-day conference will focus on Marston’s...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 7 Jul 2018

“I distinctly heard the Noise of the Tackles”

On 9 June 1768, a low-level Customs employee named Thomas Kirk told his bosses that, contrary to his declaration a month earlier, he had evidence of John Hancock’s ship Liberty being used to evade tariffs. The next day, Kirk testified as follows...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jun 2018

John Hancock’s Busy Month of May 1768

On 9 May 1768, A couple of weeks after the Customs Commissioners failed in their attempt to have John Hancock prosecuted for interfering with their employees, another of Hancock’s ships arrived in Boston harbor.“Barnard from Madeira,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2018

The Glass of Montpellier

Montpellier, France, in the seventeenth century.(Attribution unknown)Montpellier is an old city in southern France. It stands about halfway between Marseille and the Spanish border along the Mediterranean Sea (strategically located slightly inland to...
From: Conciatore on 13 Apr 2018

April 11

GUEST CURATOR:  Sean Sullivan What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Chronicle (April 11, 1768).“BOHEA TEA in large Chests, HYSON TEA in small Chests or Cannisters.” Tea was an established part of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Apr 2018

Allen McLane—Revolutionary War Intelligence Officer and Spy

There is often confusion in terms when discussing individuals involved in intelligence activities. For example, intelligence officers are often referred to as spies, and... The post Allen McLane—Revolutionary War Intelligence Officer and Spy appeared...

The James McMichael Journal, September 12, 1777–December 23, 1777

Editor’s Note: This is part four of a five-part series. Part one. Part two. Part three. This portion of the James McMichael journal begins... The post The James McMichael Journal, September 12, 1777–December 23, 1777 appeared first on Journal...

The Woman in the Moon: In Conversation with Edward’s Boys

It’s Friday, and we’re hurrying across London Bridge in the rain towards a part-carpeted Methodist Church in London’s Eastcheap: that Elizabethan-sounding nook somewhere loosely between Crutched Friars and Leadenhall (more Tudor echoes)....
From: Before Shakespeare on 13 Mar 2018

“Double bewitchment”: Love-Beams, the Mutual Gaze, and the Interpenetrating Visions of Marsilio Ficino’s De Amore

I have been arguing for a medieval and early modern paramaterial phantasy which paradoxically positioned the phantasy and its spirits somewhere between the material and the immaterial, and between the body and the soul. In this post, I want to explore...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.