The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Maryland"

Showing 1 - 20 of 67

Your search for posts with tags containing Maryland found 67 posts

October 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “From the Clergymens and Counsellors full Dress Wigs, down to the common cut Bob.” In the late summer and early fall of 1770, Thomas Hewitt, a perukemaker in Annapolis,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Oct 2020

John Marshall: Hamilton 2.

Celebrated for his stirring words in the Declaration of Independence, and having profited upon the popularity since, Thomas Jefferson was now America’s chief magistrate—and... The post John Marshall: Hamilton 2.0 appeared first on Journal...

February

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He has engaged Two exceeding good Workmen.” While eighteenth-century artisans frequently promoted their own training and other credentials, relatively few devoted space...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Feb 2020

The Death of Lt. Michael Grosh: the Maryland Militia at Germantown

In the early hours of October 4, 1777, the Maryland militia trudged southward along the Old York Road in eastern Pennsylvania. In the distance... The post The Death of Lt. Michael Grosh: the Maryland Militia at Germantown appeared first on Journal of...

February 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The Smith’s Shop is carried on … with the same Care and Dispatch as was in her Husband’s Lifetime.” When Thomas Williams, a blacksmith in Prince...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Feb 2020

February 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Nothing has been contrary to the true Spirit and Intention of the Articles of Association.” Legh Master’s advertisement for “A CARGO of European and East...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Feb 2020

January 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “ADVERTISEMENTS, of a moderate Length, are inserted the First Time, for 5s.” How much did it cost to place an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper? That question...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Jan 2020

January 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “THE MARYLAND ALMANACK, FOR THE YEAR 1770.” The Adverts 250 Project and the Slavery Adverts 250 Project draw their contents from several databases of eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Jan 2020

Biography - Marylander Ann Teresa Mathews 1732-1800 Founder of the 1st US Roman Catholic Convent

.Marylander Ann Teresa Mathews (1732-1800), founder with Frances Dickinson (1755-1830), of the 1st Roman Catholic convent for women in the United States, was born in Charles County, one of 3 children of Joseph & Susannah (Craycroft) Mathews. Her father,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 7 Dec 2019

Religious Paintings and Mental Health

A brief notice appeared in the American Journal of Insanity from January 1856 highlights once again therapeutic importance of ambience especially for treating insanity: Gift to the Maryland Hospital A beautiful oil painting has been received at the Maryland...
From: Darin Hayton on 17 Nov 2019

First Licensed Female Colonial Printer - Dinah Nuthead of 1695 Maryland

In 1695, Dinah Nuthead inherited her husband's printing press in St. Mary's City, Maryland. St. Mary's was the capital of the state at that time, & her husband William acted as the government's printer. Less than a year later, Dinah moved the printing...
From: 17th-century American Women on 15 Mar 2018

Africans in Maryland - Slave & Free - Men & Women

Soon after the settlement of Maryland in the 17C, British ships with Africans for sale as slaves began to appear in the Chesapeake. The Atlantic Ocean route between Africa and the Americas was called the Middle Passage. Planters looking for a cheap labor...
From: 17th-century American Women on 19 Aug 2017

1666 Defense of Servitude in Maryland

The necessariness of Servitude proved, with the common usage of Servants in Mary-Land, together with their PriviledgesAs there can be Monarchy without the Supremacy of a King and Crown, nor no King without Subjects, nor any Parents without it be by the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Jun 2013

Thomas Fletchall’s Association: A Loyalist Proclamation in the South Carolina Backcountry

Thomas Fletchall was a man of considerable influence in the South Carolina backcountry. Born in Maryland in 1725, Fletchall and his family relocated to... The post Thomas Fletchall’s Association: A Loyalist Proclamation in the South Carolina Backcountry...

1648 Margaret Brent - Maryland Attorney Who Owns Land Is Denied Right to Vote

Margaret Brent was an unusual woman for her time. In 17C America, she was unmarried, a business-person, a Catholic, & a prominent figure in the Maryland settlement, which she emigrated to from England with two brothers & a sister in 1638. She...
From: 17th-century American Women on 20 May 2018

James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story

Of the thousands of men and women who contributed to the Patriot cause during the American Revolution, James McCubbin Lingan (1751–1812) stands out with... The post James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story appeared first on Journal of the American...

Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore

History occasionally provides a pleasant surprise by revealing the record of an ordinary person who, thrust into a unique role, performed extraordinary services for... The post Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore appeared first on Journal...

1755 Marylanders read of a new London school theater for Christmas Plays

1733 The Laughing Audience from an etching by William Hogarth (1697-1764) detail adapted by Edward Matthew Ward (1816-1879)British American colonists were at least aware of the English tradition of staging plays at Christmas. In 1755, the Maryland Gazette...
From: 18th-century American Women on 12 Dec 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.