The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Massachusetts"

Showing 1 - 20 of 455

Your search for posts with tags containing Massachusetts found 455 posts

March 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A small Assortment of English Goods, (imported before the late Agreements of the Merchants).” The partnership of Smith and Atkinson offered cash for “Merchantable...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Mar 2020

Sisters in Service: Salem 1918

When your focus is on historical women, as mine has been for these 2020 #salemsuffragesaturday posts, sometimes you find their stories are somewhat segregated from what is going on at a particular time, and sometimes it is clear that their stories are...
From: streets of salem on 28 Mar 2020

March 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A second-hand Coach, a Variety of second-hand Chaises.” Adino Paddock, a coachmaker, occasionally advertised in Boston’s newspapers in the late 1760s and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Mar 2020

March 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Will be READ, The Beggar’s OPERA.” An itinerant performer toured New England in the fall of 1769, placing newspaper advertisements to promote his performances...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Mar 2020

“Otis got into a mad freak to-night”

With everything else going on in Boston in the wake of the Boston Massacre, I don’t want to lose track of James Otis’s mental state.In early September 1769, Otis was speaking extravagantly, monopolizing conversation, and annoying even his...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2020

New Salem

So now I am on my “spring break” with the reality of no return to my classrooms: everything is converted to digital/remote in this new corona community. This is ominous for me; I prefer to teach in person. I can rise to the occasion—I...
From: streets of salem on 17 Mar 2020

March 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All sorts of English Goods, imported before the Non-importation Agreement took place.” Richard Draper, printer of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Mar 2020

The Battle of the Roses

For this #salemsuffragesaturday, a look at the contest between Massachusetts suffragists and anti-suffragists at the turn of the last century, with particular reference to the Massachusetts suffrage referendum of 1915. Though Massachusetts had (and still...
From: streets of salem on 14 Mar 2020

Jonas Obscow, Natick Indian and Continental Soldier

Jonas Obscow (also spelled Obsco and Obscho) was born in Natick on 5 June 1739. The town’s vital records don’t identify his parents, but a man of the same name—presumably this baby’s father—died in 1745. His probate file,...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2020

March 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Landing of – Troops in the Year 1768.” At the time of the Boston Massacre, more newspapers were published in that city than any other in the colonies. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Mar 2020

A Town Meeting for a Town in Turmoil

After the shooting on King Street on 5 Mar 1770, townspeople raced to take the wounded to doctors and to demand justice.British army officers struggled to get from their lodgings to their companies’ barracks. They feared that locals would gather...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Mar 2020

Witness to the Massacre

This week is filled with events in commemoration of the Sestercentennial  (or Semiquincentennial?) of the Boston Massacre on March 5: the usual reenactment, and much more. For a full calendar check out this post on Boston 1775, one of my very favorite...
From: streets of salem on 3 Mar 2020

February 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “List of Commissioners and other Officers of the Revenue, WITH THEIR SALARIES!” In the third week of February 1770, many printers continued to advertise almanacs, hoping...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Feb 2020

February 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “All of which were imported before the Non-Importation Agreement took Place.” Colonial merchants and shopkeepers frequently incorporated details about how they came...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Feb 2020

North Easton LOVE

In southeastern Massachusetts there exists a village that is both the ideal of a “company town” and a model for historic preservation and adaptive reuse of industrial structures: North Easton, shaped in so many ways by the prosperous Ames...
From: streets of salem on 18 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part

Here are the answers to the questions remaining from part 1 of the Great 1770 Quiz, along with the background and sources for each answer. III. Match the person to the weapon he reportedly carried at the Boston Massacre.1) catstick2) cordwood stick3)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2020

February 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The House to be supplied with the News-Papers for the Amusement of his Customers.” When Daniel Jones opened a tavern “at the Sign of the HAT and HELMET”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Feb 2020

February 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AUCTION HALL … JOHN GERRISH, (And COMPANY).” This week the Adverts 250 Project has examined John Gerrish’s attempts to expand his media market beyond newspapers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Feb 2020

Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain

The efforts of the American Provincial Congress at the beginning of the revolutionary war against Great Britain offer the perfect case study to understand... The post Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain...

Happy Birthday, Isaiah Thomas!

Isaiah Thomas, patriot printer and founder of the American Antiquarian Society, was born on January 30 (January 19 Old Style) in 1749.  It’s quite an historical coincidence that the three most significant printers in eighteenth-century America...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.