The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Massachusetts"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Massachusetts found 514 posts

Whatever Happened to Jesse Saville?

On 7 Apr 1770, acting governor Thomas Hutchinson sent the Massachusetts General Court documents from Essex County justices of the peace describing the previous month’s mobbing of Jesse Saville. Hutchinson said Saville “had been most inhumanly...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2020

“I would hope that you are the Sons of Liberty from principle”

I want to highlight the web version of Jordan E. Taylor’s Early American Studies article “Enquire of the Printer: The Slave Trade and Early American Newspaper Advertising.”Produced using ArcGIS’s Storymaps platform, the article...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Nov 2020

November 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The remainder of the Articles will be advertised next Week.” Readers of Boston’s newspapers in the late 1760s and early 1770s would have been familiar with shopkeeper...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Nov 2020

October 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “New Advertisements.” What qualified as front page news in eighteenth-century American newspapers?  Even asking that question reveals a difference between how...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Oct 2020

Voting Matters

I am very, very anxious about the election and can think of little else. I have enough of a historian’s sensibility, of a human’s sensibility, to know that this is the most momentous election of my life. Of course there is little...
From: streets of salem on 27 Oct 2020

October 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Sermon occasion’d by the sudden and much lamented Death of the Rev. GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” In the wake of George Whitefield’s death on September 30, 1770,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Oct 2020

October 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Great Allowance to travelling Traders, &c.” Following the death of George Whitefield, one of the most prominent ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Oct 2020

October 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Printed and sold by Z. FOWLE and I. THOMAS, at the new Printing Office.” In the middle of July 1770, Isaiah Thomas distributed a preliminary issue of the Massachusetts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Oct 2020

October 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AN Elegiac POEM, on the Death of … GEORGE WHITEFIELD … By PHILLIS.” On October 11, 1770, coverage of George Whitefield’s death on September 30 continued...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Oct 2020

“Those Letters were not the writings he meant”

When William Story told Thomas Hutchinson in the summer of 1772 that he’d seen some problematic “writings” by the governor, he probably didn’t couch that in the form of a threat.Rather, Story likely used the language of the patronage...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Oct 2020

Arthur Lee “in the light of a rival”

Yesterday I quoted two letters from Samuel Adams in 1771, the first recommending William Story to a lobbyist in London and the second warning the same man that Story might be conspiring with Gov. Thomas Hutchinson.One might think that on receiving those...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2020

When William Story Sailed to London

On 2 Oct 1771, the speaker of the Massachusetts House, Thomas Cushing, wrote a letter to that body’s lobbyist in London, Benjamin Franklin. Though the letter enclosed some legislative news, Cushing was really writing a reference for the man who...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Oct 2020

The Big News in Boston 250 Years Ago

On 1 Oct 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston Gazette ran three major pieces of news. The first item came from Philadelphia, where on 12 September a group of seventeen merchants had published a public letter saying:Many of the inhabitants of this City,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2020

Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, January 1759–176

On May 7, 1757, Thomas Pownall sailed from England for Boston to take his post as the governor of Massachusetts. Aboard the ship was... The post Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, January 1759–1760 appeared first on Journal of the American...

September 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “LISBON LEMONS … to be sold at the Sign of the Basket of Lemons.” The selection of advertisements for the Adverts 250 Project is contingent on which newspapers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Sep 2020

“Less fortunate in my Military reputation than some others”

As I recounted yesterday, Gen. George Washington dismissed Maj. Scarborough Gridley from the Continental Army on 24 Sept 1775.Dealing with the major’s father, Col. Richard Gridley, was harder. It took a lot of maneuvering by the commander-in-chief,...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Sep 2020

September 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Black Boy and Butt in Cornhill.” In an advertisement in the September 13, 1770, edition of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter, Jonathan...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Sep 2020

September

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Some People have surmised that the above Advertisement was inserted only to amuse the Publick.” Henry Barnes, a merchant, did not meet with success the first time...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Sep 2020

Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, August 1757 to December 1758

Thomas Pownall was appointed “Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over . . . the Province of the Massachusetts Bay” on February 25, 1757. He... The post Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, August 1757 to December 1758 appeared...

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.