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Search Results for "Mathew and his work"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Mathew and his work found 33 posts

The end of a European union

A decades-long union of European countries is supported by the respective national elites; but its destruction comes through the ruthless exploitation of popular nationalism by an autocratic leader. Does that sound familiar? It is, of course, the Kalmar...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp: the film Churchill tried to kill

It’s 10 September 1942. The German army is at Stalingrad. Bomber Command is sending 479 planes to bomb Düsseldorf. And Winston Churchill is writing to Brendan Bracken, his Minister of Information, about a British film already in production....
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Literary Review: Sons of the Waves by Stephen Taylor

At their peak, early in the 19th century, there were some 262,427 of them across Britain’s naval and merchant fleets. People called them Jacks, but they are nameless mostly. Or nameless to history. Even on surviving musters, their identities can...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

The pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod

On 6 May 1939 the pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod was elected to the Disney chair of archaeology at Cambridge. She was the first woman to be a professor at either Oxford or Cambridge; women were still not admitted to full degrees at the university...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

How two Greek monks remade the English church

Five of the first six archbishops of Canterbury to be consecrated were not native to this country. None came from as far afield as the seventh: Theodore, born in 602, was a Greek-speaking monk from Tarsus – the modern Turkish city of Gözlü...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Months Past

Really pleased to have been asked to take over the regular Months Past feature in History Today. My first two pieces appeared in the May issue. I’ll be posting them here in due course.
From: Mathew Lyons on 7 May 2020

The Quietus: A New Day Yesterday by Mike Barnes

It’s early 1974, British band Henry Cow is in the studio recording its second album, Unrest. One track features a 40-foot tape loop. Another is based on the Fibonacci sequence, a structural device borrowed from Karlheinz Stockhausen. The track is...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Apr 2020

FT: Dead Famous by Greg Jenner

On Guy Fawkes’ Night in 1709, Henry Sacheverell, an Anglican minister, preached an incediary sermon in St Paul’s against religious non-conformity in the church. It was widely interpreted as a coded attack on the then Whig government, not least...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Apr 2020

Living through lockdown: Julian of Norwich, TS Eliot and the life-shaped hole in our hearts

For those who don’t feel inclined to watch the film I made for A Bit Lit on life during lockdown, here’s a rough transcript. My name is Mathew Lyons, and I am a freelance writer and historian. In practice, that means I am lucky enough to mostly...
From: Mathew Lyons on 15 Apr 2020

The life-shaped hole in our hearts: thoughts on living under lockdown

A couple of weeks ago I was invited to contribute a brief film to the A Bit Lit YouTube channel, created by Andy Kesson and others as a forum for thoughts on literature, history and culture during lockdown. So here I am, talking about freedom and confinement,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 14 Apr 2020

The Author review: Book Parts, edited by Dennis Duncan and Adam Smyth

In 1723 the London bookseller Thomas Graves published a 12-page pamphlet entitled The First of April. Written in praise of the author of a recent poem named Ridotto, or Downfal of Masquerades, it comprises a title page, a six-page dedicatory epistle,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 10 Feb 2020

Literary Review: Sailing School by Margaret E Schotte

On Christmas Eve, 1789, HMS Guardian found itself in the shadow of two great icebergs some 1,300 miles south-east of the Cape of Good Hope. The ship’s captain, 29-year-old Edward Riou, ordered a double watch be kept, but, engulfed in fog and with...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Jan 2020

History Today review: The Matter of Song in Early Modern England by Katherine R Larson

A couple of years ago I was lucky enough to hear legendary English folk singer Shirley Collins perform. One of the songs she sang was ‘Awake, Awake’, written by Thomas Deloney in 1580 but seemingly forgotten until Ralph Vaughan Williams heard...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Jan 2020

History Today review: Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist by Elizabeth Goldring

It is July 1571, and Elizabeth I is sitting for a portrait in “the open ally of a goodly garden”, almost certainly at Hampton Court. The portrait is “in little” – what we would now call a watercolour miniature, although the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

Renaissance Studies review: Thomas Churchyard: Pen, Sword, Ego by Matthew Woodcock

If, as every self-help book will tell you, persistence really were the key to success, Thomas Churchyard would surely have been the most successful writer of the sixteenth century. Reader, he was not – but it was not for want of trying. One measure...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

BBC History: Henry Fitzroy – the forgotten Tudor prince

Henry Fitzroy was born in the summer of 1519 – almost certainly in June – at the small Augustinian Priory of St Laurence at Blackmore in Essex. His mother was Elizabeth Blount, herself not yet 20, who came from minor Shropshire gentry. Elizabeth...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

All About History: The Search for El Dorado

Not many people have the distinction of putting a non-existent place on the map, but Sir Walter Ralegh was one of them. That place was El Dorado, a legendary city of gold located in what is now Venezuela. But even that word ‘city’ is too precise....
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Aug 2019

BBC History: The 1603 trial of Walter Ralegh

It is a curious fact that when Sir Walter Ralegh was finally executed – on 29 October 1618 – he had been legally dead for 15 years. Even by 17th-century standards, that was unusual. But then, not many people face the death penalty twice in...
From: Mathew Lyons on 31 Jan 2019

The Stage review: Ralegh: The Treason Trial

Before its run in the Sam Wanamaker Theatre beginning 24 November, Oliver Chris’ staging of Sir Walter Ralegh’s treason trial had several performances in the Great Hall in Winchester, where the trial itself was held on 17 November 1603. Ralegh...
From: Mathew Lyons on 31 Jan 2019

Review: Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

MGM, at its zenith in the 1940s, used to boast that it had more stars than there are in heaven on its roster. It’s a phrase that came back to me walking round the current, jaw-droppingly good exhibition at the British Library, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms:...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Dec 2018

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.