The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Matters Maritme"

Your search for posts with tags containing Matters Maritme found 13 posts

Captain John Ross and the search for the North West Passage, 1818

Having chosen a George Cruikshank  illustration in my last blog, here is another one, dating from 1819 and entitled ‘Landing the Treasures, or Results of the Polar Expedition!!!’  The background to it was the fact that in the 19th...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 27 Oct 2020

THE GREAT STORM OF 1703 – AN 18TH CENTURY TRAGEDY

Image courtesy of the Royal Museums, Greenwich. Today I am delighted to offer a guest post to freelance writer Lucy Lawrence. She has many years experience across a variety of sectors, having made the move to freelancing from a stressful corporate job...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 15 Feb 2018

Blackbeard, the famous pirate, killed 22 November 1718.

Of all the pirates in the so-called ‘Golden Age’ none typified the image of the swash-buckling buccaneer better than Edward Teach – the man known to history as ‘Blackbeard’.  Much of what we know about his exploits comes...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 22 Nov 2017

Exactly 217 years ago today: Remembering HMS Queen Charlotte – and a warning never to mix wooden ships with naked flames.

The diary entry of my ancestor Richard Hall, for March 1800, reads: “The Queen Charlotte Man of War took fire and blew up – it is feared not less than 700 lives are lost.” It was typical of many such diary entries of my ancestor, who...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 17 Mar 2017

th November 1759, Hawke’s heroic victory at the Battle of Quiberon Bay.

A week after the naval victory over the French at Quiberon Bay, Richard noted the “Day of General Thanksgiving, observed for the great and plentiful harvest, and the train of successes the Lord has been pleased this year to give us over our Enemies...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 20 Nov 2016

Another chance to mark the death of a great Frenchman – Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville.

Time to dust off a blog I did a year ago commemorating the death of a remarkable Frenchman:Every so often, I have a complete mental aberration and decide to write something nice about a Frenchman. What has prompted it this time? Looking out the window...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Aug 2016

Let’s hear it for Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville, who died on 31 August 1811.

Every so often, I have a complete mental aberration and decide to write something nice about a Frenchman. What has prompted it this time? Looking out the window at the magnificent bougainvillea which has spread across the head of the steps leading from...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Aug 2015

Happy Birthday to HMS Victory, 250 years old today.

As daylight broke on 7th May 1765 there were scenes of frantic activity down at the docks at Chatham Dockyard: men with adzes were frantically hacking chunks of wood off the gate-posts at the entrance of the dry dock where a ship was waiting to be launched....
From: Georgian Gentleman on 7 May 2015

For all the tea in China…

I am delighted to have a guest blog today from the irrepressible Elizabeth Hopkinson, author of  a just-released novel Silver Hands which contains lots of detailed background information about trade with the Far East in the 17th and 18th Centuries....
From: Georgian Gentleman on 26 Apr 2013

23 April 1779: a storm shivers the timbers on HMS Terrible

Writing in his notebook about extreme weather conditions, Richard Hall notes: The Terrible, launched in Harwich in 1762, was the fourth of that name (if you include vessels captured from the Spanish and the French, and then re-named). It doesn’t...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 23 Apr 2013

2nd April: What links Horatio Nelson, a lightning strike, and turning a blind eye? An Elephant.

Writing in his note-book of extreme weather conditions my ancestor Richard comments: In late November 1790 HMS Elephant narrowly avoided total destruction when lightning struck her whilst she was in Portsmouth harbour. The main topmast  exploded but...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 2 Apr 2013

HMS Queen Charlotte – never mix wooden ships with naked flames.

                                          The diary entry of my ancestor Richard Hall, for March 1800. The destruction by fire of the British warship HMS Queen Charlotte on 17 March 1800 was one of the most disastrous...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 18 Mar 2013

1st August 1797 – mutiny on the High Seas!

On 1st August 1797 the ship Lady Shore was some four days off the coast of Brazil. The ship had been built for the East India trade, and had gained its name after Lady Charlotte Shore, wife of Sir John Shore, who was Governor General of India at the...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 1 Aug 2012