The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Medical"

Showing 1 - 20 of 306

Your search for posts with tags containing Medical found 306 posts

Canine Cures or Our Best Friend…

By Marc Bruck To paraphrase the old adage: dogs are humanity’s best friend. Loving, loyal and protective, they are often considered members of the family. They are symbols of wealth and power, love and affection. Recent accounts in the popular press,...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2020

Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch”

Although it may not have been fatal, scabies brought more patients to British Army hospitals during the Seven Years’ War than any other condition,... The post Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch” appeared first on Journal of the...

Isaac Archer’s Sickly Preaching

[In our mini-series ‘A Page in the Life’, each post briefly introduces a new writer and a single page from their manuscript. In this post, Dr Robert W. Daniel of the University of Warwick offers us insights into the diary of the Church...
From: the many-headed monster on 1 Jul 2020

The Béguines of Malines

A Béguine of Antwerp,from Pierre Hélyot,L'Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)Five years into his stay in Antwerp, on 21 February 1608, glassmaker Antonio Neri posted a letter to a friend in Florence. The letter was addressed...
From: Conciatore on 26 Jun 2020

Abstain from onions – if you want to avoid flatulencies, thirst, headaches or turbulent dreams.

My ancestor Richard Hall loved collecting what might be called ‘factoids’ – snippets of information presented as scientific facts, but often rather lacking in accuracy. One of his factoids, stored in his little notebook, reads: ‘Onions...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 25 Jun 2020

Online Archives Unlocked: What’s in it for Crime Historians?

By Cassie Watson; posted 13 June 2020. At a time when none of us can go to any archive, I decided to investigate the online contents of collections made temporarily available to university staff and students during the Covid-19 pandemic. I also purchased...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 13 Jun 2020

Travel and Quarantine in the 19th Century

Amongst the many impacts of COVID-19 has been the devastation of the travel industry, and its knock-on effects on the global economy. We are all having to think carefully about the ways we travel, not only internationally, but even around our own countries...
From: DrAlun on 29 May 2020

Giving up the Ghost, or one too many…

A while back I was fortunate enough to buy a Rowlandson print, entitled ‘Giving up the Ghost, or, one too many’. Needless to say my wife hates it and is not inclined to let me  display it on the living room walls. Which is a shame because...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 23 May 2020

Revisiting Erik Heinrichs’ The Live Chicken Treatment for Buboes: Trying a Plague Cure in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Erik Heinrichs on a seemingly odd treatment for plague buboes: the feathers from a chicken’s backside. Erik notes that there is a very long history of using chickens and chicken broths in medicine,...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 May 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Justin McHenry on John Morgan, William Shippen, and the Fate of the Continental Medical Department

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews archivist and JAR contributor Justin McHenry about the heated rivalry between John Morgan and William Shippen over control... The post This Week on Dispatches: Justin McHenry on John...

Barbers and Shaving in the Eighteenth Century

“It is the business of the barber to cut and dress hair, to make wigs and false curls, and to shave the beards of other men. In ancient times he used, also, to trim the nails; and even in the present day, in Turkey, this is a part of his employment”....
From: DrAlun on 8 Apr 2020

Quarantine in the Northwest: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Measures to Stop the 1779-1783 Smallpox Epidemic

Scott Berthelette Near the end of the summer of 1782, Hudson’s Bay Company chief factor of York Factory, Matthew Cocking lamented: “Never has a Letter in Hudson’s Bay conveyed more doleful Tidings than this… Much the greatest...
From: Borealia on 30 Mar 2020

Killer Advertising—How Canadians Were Sold the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Kate Barker As news reports come in of scammers trying to leverage a global pandemic into profit at the expense of Canadians, it is an interesting time to examine the equivalent during the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic. Patent medicine companies and others...
From: Borealia on 23 Mar 2020

Beard Sculpting in the 19th Century.

Over the course of the past four or five years or so, one of the biggest growth areas in the personal grooming industry has been in products for cleaning, styling, or beautifying the beard. A whole host of options are now available, including beard oils,...
From: DrAlun on 18 Mar 2020

The Béguines of Malines

A Béguine of Antwerp,from Pierre Hélyot,L'Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)Five years into his stay in Antwerp, on 21 February 1608, glassmaker Antonio Neri posted a letter to a friend in Florence. The letter was addressed...
From: Conciatore on 13 Mar 2020

Hearing and Speaking the Law in Medieval England

By Sara M. Butler; posted 21 February 2020. A recent article in the Journal of Legal History by Gwen Seabourne addresses one of the more unusual requirements of medieval law. If a widower hoped to remain on the land brought into marriage by his dead wife,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 21 Feb 2020

On This Day...

Each day on my Twitter at MadameGilflurt, I share a variety of stories of Georgians who were born, died or otherwise became notable #onthisday, under the hashtag #GloriousGeorgians.Here's a particularly choice one, to kick you off - don't read whilst...

John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department

John Morgan and William Shippen, Jr. stood shoulder to shoulder in the crowd outside of old Westminster Hall on September 22, 1761. They were... The post John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department appeared...

Béguines of Malines

A Béguine of Antwerp,from Pierre Hélyot,L'Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)Five years into his stay in Antwerp, on 21 February 1608, glassmaker Antonio Neri posted a letter to a friend in Florence. The letter was addressed...
From: Conciatore on 20 Nov 2019

Halloween Special: Shaving the Dead in Irish Folklore

Shaving the dead in Irish folklore The Irish Folklore Collection archive in University College Dublin contains a massive volume of documents, sound-recordings and other material collected under the auspices of the Irish Folklore Commission and other bodies...
From: DrAlun on 31 Oct 2019

Page 1 of 16123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.