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Search Results for "Medicine"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Medicine found 961 posts

Plague Water

Over the past few weeks, friends, family members, students, and colleagues have been asking me about plague and recipes. Outbreaks of the plague, and restrictive public health initiatives designed to stop the spread of the disease, were a regular...
From: Cooking in the Archives on 2 Apr 2020

Containing Coronavirus in Brussels

I have been conducting archival research in Belgium as a Fulbright Research Scholar and collaborating with colleagues at the Université Catholique de Louvain this semester, but the coronavirus pandemic has intervened and disrupted our plans. ...

The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons

“I often thought that the situation of a people in a bombarded city, was not much worse, and on some accounts not so bad;... The post The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

3 into 2 does go!

It would of course be totally unethical for me to review a book of which I am one of the authors. However, as my contribution is only six of two-hundred pages, of which three are illustrations, and the book is one that could/would/should interest some...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 25 Mar 2020

Killer Advertising—How Canadians Were Sold the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Kate Barker As news reports come in of scammers trying to leverage a global pandemic into profit at the expense of Canadians, it is an interesting time to examine the equivalent during the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic. Patent medicine companies and others...
From: Borealia on 23 Mar 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Katie Turner Getty on Combating the Spread of Disease Eighteenth-Century Style

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews attorney and JAR associate editor Katie Turner Getty on the use of smoke to fumigate refugees from... The post This Week on Dispatches: Katie Turner Getty on Combating the Spread of Disease...

Jonas Obscow, Natick Indian and Continental Soldier

Jonas Obscow (also spelled Obsco and Obscho) was born in Natick on 5 June 1739. The town’s vital records don’t identify his parents, but a man of the same name—presumably this baby’s father—died in 1745. His probate file,...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2020

Hsiung on “The Metabolism of Military Forces,” 10 Mar.

On Tuesday, 10 March, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a joint session of its Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar and Boston Seminar on Environmental History series.Prof. David Hsiung of Juniata College will present a paper on “The...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2020

March 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “MAREDAUNT’s DROPS, May be had at the Book Store.” The colophon on the final page of the Pennsylvania Journal stated that the newspapers was “Printed...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Mar 2020

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

The Life and Death of Christopher Seider

The younger boy hit by “Swan shot” from Ebenezer Richardson’s musket on 22 Feb 1770 was named Christopher Seider (although that last name also showed up as Snider and in other forms). Christopher’s story starts with an effort to...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2020

The Benefits of Juniper Berries

Today pubs and bars are filled to the brim with wondrous varieties of Gin. The spirit has been resurgent in recent years becoming the fashionable drink of discerning customers. Its varied flavours created through the use of different botanical blends...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Transforming Waste into Food – Skimmed Milk

By Lesley Steinitz Fancy some pig’s wash with your granola? In the late nineteenth century, the ‘pig’s wash’ – a euphemism also for vomit – was skimmed milk. It was so-named because it had been the sour leftovers after...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Feb 2020

February 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A choice Collection of genuine Patent Medicines.” As was a common practice for colonial printers, Timothy Green often inserted multiple advertisements in the newspaper...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Feb 2020

A Hidden History of Beard Terms!

2020 will be a milestone for me, as it sees the completion of my research, and the submission of my book Concerning Beards: Facial Hair, Health and Practice in England, 1650-1900, in many ways bringing an end to my project on the history of facial hair...
From: DrAlun on 14 Feb 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part III

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jan 2020

Fox Flesh

The self-styled ‘Professor of Physick’ and prolific publisher of medical texts William Salmon (1644-1713) was described by some as the ‘King of the Quacks’.1 While I’m sure he did not see himself in that light he was an empiric,...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Jan 2020

A Sampler of Bethiah Hastings

Yesterday Stacey Fraser at the Lexington Historical Society shared an image of a sampler from its collection and thoughts about its political significance. “This sampler was completed by Bethiah Hastings of Lexington at age 8” in 1774, Fraser...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jan 2020

John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department

John Morgan and William Shippen, Jr. stood shoulder to shoulder in the crowd outside of old Westminster Hall on September 22, 1761. They were... The post John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department appeared...

Dublin Seminar to Look at “Living with Disabilities”

The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife has announced the subject of this year’s conference: “Living with Disabilities in New England, 1630–1930.”The conference will be held in Deerfield, Massachusetts, on the weekend of 19-21...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.