The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Medicine"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1070

Your search for posts with tags containing Medicine found 1070 posts

February

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “&c. &c.” Joshua Brackett placed an advertisement in the February 22, 1771, edition of the New-Hampshire Gazette to inform prospective customers that he had...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Feb 2021

Workshop Report: Drugs and Drollery

It was an honour for the Wellcome Collection to join Intoxicating Spaces and a group of eminent scholars for an online workshop that took place on 21–22 January 2021 on Modes of Persuasion: Humour and the Promotion and Control of Intoxicants Past...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 17 Feb 2021

Archiater

 Antonio Neri's family arms, from the vestibuleof the Palazzo Marzichi-Lenzi, Florence.Archiater was a title used in ancient times for the doctors of Roman Emperors. Later, this term was applied to the head physicians of rulers throughout Europe....
From: Conciatore on 12 Feb 2021

Dr Joshua Ward, the ‘Friar’s Balsam’ man

I recently came across an advert in the Newcastle Courant, 24 November 1744 for a product I recalled from childhood, ‘Friar’s Balsam’. I have a vague recollection of adding it to hot water to inhale to ease the symptoms of a cold. No...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Feb 2021

Bergman, “Medical Merchandizing & Legal Procedure in 16th Cent Spain”

Ted Lars Lennart Bergman, “Medical Merchandizing and Legal Procedure in Late Sixteenth-Century Spain: The Case of Petroleum as Imported Medicine,” Social History of Medicine 33/4 (November 2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 2 Feb 2021

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “I think it my Duty to acquaint the Publick, that I met with a Doctor … [who] made a sound Cure of me.” One brief advertisement in the supplement that accompanied...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2021

January 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Choice Labradore Tea.” Two advertisements in the January 29, 1771, edition of the Essex Gazette promoted tea to colonial consumers.  William Vans advertised “CHOICE...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jan 2021

Medieval Architecture, Early Modern Music, and Covid Vaccinations

Salisbury Cathedral is currently serving as a Covid-19 vaccination site in the United Kingdom. The soaring medieval architecture provides a vast, airy space for health care providers and British citizens getting vaccinated. Salisbury Cathedral (New...

Probing the Tale of Warren and Jeffries

I’ve just shared the two versions of the story of Dr. Joseph Warren sneaking across the siege lines in early June 1775 to try to talk Dr. John Jeffries into heading the provincial medical corps.Both versions present Dr. Jeffries as a badass: so...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2021

The man who printed the world of plants

Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) is justifiably famous for having produced the world’s first modern atlas, that is a bound, printed, uniform collection of maps, his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Ortelius was a wealthy businessman and paid for the publication...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jan 2021

“The connection of my father and General Joseph Warren, M.D.”

In 1875, Bostonians were very excited about the Centennial of the start of the Revolutionary War. Naturally, that included the editorial staff of the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal.People at that magazine asked Dr. John Jeffries (1796-1876), whose...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2021

Dr. Jeffries and Dr. Warren

When I started looking at Dr. John Jeffries’s records of caring for young smallpox inoculatees in June 1775, I hoped to find clues to his whereabouts during that month.For almost two hundred years at least, a story has circulated about Jeffries...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2021

How Aged Was William Northage?

This evening I came across an example of the importance of checking original documents where possible to confirm transcriptions.In a 1993 article in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine titled “John Jeffries and the Struggle Against Smallpox...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2021

January 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The most effectual Medicine that has ever yet been offered to the Public, for the Cure of an inveterate Scurvy.” John Norton, surgeon and proprietor of “Maredant’s...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Jan 2021

Learning to Walk

The baby walker is a device to support an infant who is not yet independently mobile to ‘walk’ around. In the past they were thought to aid the child’s development as she learned to walk. Images of the baby walker date back at least...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 12 Jan 2021

The Mystery of Dr. Martyn

As I described yesterday, in the late 1760s Nathaniel Martyn held a respected position in rural Massachusetts society. Youngest son of the minister at Northborough, he had become a physician and landowner in Harvard and married a young woman from Bolton....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jan 2021

How Natty Martyn Grew Up

Last September, we got a passing glimpse of fifteen-year-old Natty Martyn, youngest son of the minister in Northborough in 1756. Natty had a bad sore, and his family had begun to despair for him. The Rev. John Martyn took his son to Dr. Ebenezer Dexter...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2021

Weight loss Wonders

Fad diets are  perhaps a modern concept, but if we look back to the seventeenth century we can find some pretty interesting weight loss remedies. As we have seen previously some medical writers felt that the shape of your belly had a lot to say about...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Sep 2013

Page 1 of 54123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.