The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Medieval History"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Medieval History found 24 posts

Doctoral Fellowships in European History

The European University Institute in Fiesole, Italy, is offering fully funded doctoral fellowships for students wishing to pursue Ph.D. studies in European history. The European University Institute (EUI) is located on a majestic hill overlooking...

New Research on Vikings

DNA studies are revealing new information on complicated ethnic backgrounds of Viking warriors and traders in medieval Europe. A research team led by a professor at the University of Copenhagen has analyzed the genomes of 443 bodies buried in Viking...

Law Enforcement Officials and the Limits of Violence in Medieval England

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 18 August 2020. Towards the end of the fifteenth century, William Hemyng, a chaplain associated with Hereford cathedral, experienced a harrowing ordeal. Richard Rollesden, undersheriff to Thomas Parker, the county sheriff, stole...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 18 Aug 2020

Eat, Drink & Be Merry

For the most part, I’ve managed to avoid dwelling on the pandemic and I must admit that I haven’t been that affected by it either, apart from the radical reconfiguration of my work environment! My struggle is to improve my online communication...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jul 2020

Catastrophe, cultural memory, and the ‘dust veil’ of 536

What can Old Norse accounts of Fimbulvetr (‘Great Winter’) tell us about cultural memory of the ‘dust veil’ of  536 throughout Europe? In his new article (now live on the Cerae website), Andrea Maraschi explores just...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 21 Mar 2020

The Last Crusade: Napoleon and the Knights Hospitaller

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Thomas Lecaque Knights on horseback, charging beneath...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Dec 2019

Sir Joseph Banks and the Medieval Icelandic Saga

In this article, our social media editor Matt Firth looks at the career of Joseph Banks (1743-1820), and the collection of Icelandic texts he left the British Library… For Australians, Joseph Banks (1743-1820) is a familiar name from our colonial...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 30 Oct 2019

Conference Review – AEMA 2019, Monash University

In this article, Cerae committee member Cassandra Schilling reflects on the 2019 conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association (3-5 Oct) A reminder that, if you are thinking of turning your conference paper into an article, Cerae is open...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 10 Oct 2019

A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 178

In this article, our editor Christina Cleary takes a look at BL MS Egerton 1782, a 16th century Irish manuscript that preserves Early Irish tales that have not otherwise survived the centuries… The vellum manuscript known as Egerton 1782, housed...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 11 Aug 2019

CFP Leeds IMC 2020 Panel: ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’

Call for Papers ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’ International Medieval Congress 2020, Leeds Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies invites abstracts for papers on the theme of ‘Minority and Marginalised...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 10 Aug 2019

La Rochelle and the Roman de Melusine

In this article, our deputy reviews editor Kirsty Bolton takes a look at the medieval port town of La Rochelle, its legendary founder, and its fraught political history… In June, I spent a few days in La Rochelle, a medieval port town...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 28 Jul 2019

Rudolf II and the Material Culture of the Holy Roman Empire

How did an emperor’s interest in collecting art connect with representations of his cultural and imperial legacy? In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Miranda Lee Elston explores Rudolf II’s fascination with the religious...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 12 Jun 2019

Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

How was the classical historian Sallust read in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and what does this reveal about medieval moral thought? These are the questions Philippa Byrne asks in her new article (now live on the Cerae website). Philippa introduces...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 23 May 2019

Red Roofs

Patriots Day 2019 was not a very enjoyable day. It was certainly not as dreadful as Patriots Day 2013, but still a frightful day. I woke up to thunder, looked out at the dreary rain, made the decision not to drive to Lexington so I could walk the Battle...
From: streets of salem on 18 Apr 2019

Connecting my Courses

This is that time in the semester when I am inevitably behind in my course content, racing towards the end of classes in early December: in one course I’m only in thirteenth century when I should be in the fourteenth; in another I’m in the...
From: streets of salem on 16 Nov 2017

Thomas Dun: A Medieval Pirate & Highwayman

Robin Hood was not the only famous law breaker in medieval times. Alongside Robin Hood were figures such as Adam Bell and the subject of this blog post, the medieval pirate Thomas Dun. When the word ‘pirate’ is mentioned, many people will...

Magna Carta Monday

As today marks the 800th anniversary of the reluctant signing of the Magna Carta by King Johny I at Runnymeade, there clearly is no other topic on which to focus than this Charter, which has become far more momentous with history than in its own time....
From: streets of salem on 15 Jun 2015

Curtmantle

Though my primary field is Tudor-Stuart history, occasionally I teach a more general English history survey which spans from Roman era to the seventeenth century. My biggest challenge in this course, which I am teaching this semester, is to refrain from...
From: streets of salem on 5 Mar 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.