The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Medievalism"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Medievalism found 66 posts

How Robert Southey avoided getting “Cancelled”

By Stephen Basdeo The following is an adaptation of some of the material in my book The Life and Legend of a Rebel Leader: Wat Tyler (2018). You’re an up-and-coming writer, artist, musician, or actor. Things are going well until someone uncovers...

“The Life and Death of Jacke Straw” (1593)

By Stephen Basdeo The following is an excerpt from my book: The Life and Legend of a Rebel Leader: Wat Tyler (2018). It is available to buy from the publisher here: Link. Wat Tyler’s rebellion in 1381 was the first large-scale uprising of the common...

“Saxon Grit”

St George’s Day seems as fitting time as ever to publish a “new” Robin Hood poem I found titled “Saxon Grit” in the archives of a long-defunct Christian socialist magazine titled The Labour Prophet in 1892. The magazine...

Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudeslie

By Stephen Basdeo Stories of Robin Hood have been popular since at least the late fourteenth century, as we know from William Langland’s Vision of Piers Plowman (c.1377). However, around the same time that the ‘rymes of Robyn Hode’ flourished,...

“Like a faint echo from the Middle Ages”: George Orwell’s Time among the Tramps

By Stephen Basdeo It was the roaring 1920s. After the carnage of the Great War (1914–18), it truly seemed as if Britain was changing for the better in some respects. The old Victorian social mores were eroded; the first Labour government came to...

Joseph Ritson’s Discovery of “Robin Hood and the Monk” (1465)

By Stephen Basdeo While researching my book, Discovering Robin Hood: The Life of Joseph Ritson: Gentleman, Scholar, and Revolutionary, I came across some fascinating information. I give below a snippet from my forthcoming book: In 1795 Joseph Ritson,...

The Working Man’s Robin Hood: The Writings of Allan Cunningham (1784–1842)

By Stephen Basdeo In 1832, the publisher Charles Knight had a bright idea: every Saturday he would publish a new magazine which whose aim was to educate working-class readers about their world. It would not contain news, and would therefore be exempt...

Review: Alexander Kaufman’s “Jack Cade Rebellion of 1450: A Sourcebook” (2019)

By Stephen Basdeo Alexander L. Kaufman, ed. The Jack Cade Rebellion of 1450: A Sourcebook. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2020. (xii), 257pp. ISBN 978-1-4985-5029-1. £65 (RRP) As the several endorsements on the rear cover of Alexander Kaufman’s...

Stephen Basdeo’s “Robin Hood” Radio Segment

As most people know, I’ve spent a significant amount of time researching and writing about the legend of Robin Hood. Having written a Ph.D. thesis on the legend, it was a pleasure to be asked by Jonathan Wright at Pen and Sword books to write a...

A Never-Before-Seen Poem by Robert Southey, written in 1791

Edited by Stephen Basdeo and Mark Truesdale The summer of 1791 was an unusually wet one. The young schoolboy, and future Poet Laureate, Robert Southey, therefore had a lot of time on his hands. It was probably the weather that induced him to stay inside...

Joseph Ritson the Radical

By Stephen Basdeo Joseph Ritson was born in Stockton-on-Tees in 1752 to a poor yeoman family. As a child, he attended the local Unitarian Sunday School where his talents intellectual talents were noticed, which led him to being apprenticed to a conveyancer...

Revolting Women

By Stephen Basdeo This is a précis of an article written by Sylvia Federico. Please click the link and cite Federico’s well-researched article in any work of your own. Do not cite this blog post. In the summer of 1381, the common people...

“The Vision” by Robin Hood (1841)

Everyone of course loves to investigate appearances of the name of Robin Hood in medieval court records. One of these days, it might finally be proven who the “real” Robin Hood was by combing through these patchy records of medieval England....

Robert Southey’s “Wedding of Robin Hood and Maid Marian”

By Stephen Basdeo Dr Mark Truesdale and I are currently transcribing Robert Southey’s ‘Harold; or, The Castle of Morford’ (Bodleian MS Eng. Misc. e. 21), which was originally written in the summer of 1791. Robin Hood and Maid Marian,...

“If they must have a British Worthy, they would have Robin Hood”

By Stephen Basdeo This post originally appeared on the IARHS website Amongst the great writers of eighteenth-century literature, the names of two men stand out: Sir Richard Steele (1672-1729) and Joseph Addison (1672-1719). These two quintessentially...

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Sir Robin William V. Harcourt Hood, M. P.

By Stephen Basdeo Whenever a politician proposes raising a new tax or cutting a public service, a newspaper columnist will often respond that the proposed changes are ‘Reverse Robin Hood’. Alternatively, those who look favourably upon governmental...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.