The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Metals found 22 posts

A valuable ancient commodity: Miltos of Kea

By Effie Photos-Jones The island of Kea in the North Cyclades is by some travel agents’ reckoning the (rich) Athenians’ ‘best-kept secret’, their beautifully-designed stone-built villas merging seamlessly with the barren landscape overlooking...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Jun 2021

Witches Brew of Glass

 Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2020

Colouring metals in the Far East

By Agnese Benzonelli How far can someone go in the name of research? In my case quite a long way. For a month, I loosely taped tiny plates of metal to my hands and woke up every morning with green stains on them. I was investigating craft recipes employed...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2020

Witch's Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2019

Tales from the Archives: Drinkable Gold for the King of Siam

In my first months of co-editing duties here at The Recipes Project, one of my many delights has been the opportunity to dig back in our archives to rediscover posts I’ve loved over the years, to see them with fresh eyes. As a historian of Japan,...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Apr 2019

Cold! A Recipe Project Thematic Series

– it’s cold! A dreary chill and rain have just descended across Europe and perhaps most of you are also cranking up the heat and bringing out winter scarves and hats. December has arrived and it seems apt for us to follow our fun and successful...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Dec 2018

Alchemical Recipes in the AlchemEast Project

By Matteo Martel What makes a recipe alchemical? Its inclusion in an alchemical treatise, one might suggest. Indeed, naïve as it may sound, such a simple answer opens an interesting perspective from which to look at the ancient alchemical tradition....
From: The Recipes Project on 31 Oct 2018

Vicissitudes in Soldering. Reading and Working with a Historical Gold- and Silversmithing Manual

This month, we’re excited to collaborate with History of Knowledge to celebrate the upcoming conference, Learning by the Book: Manuals and Handbooks in the History of Knowledge. The five-day event takes place at Princeton in June and features...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 May 2018

Searching for Syphilis in Recipe Books

By Olivia Weisser I have been on the search for syphilis – or venereal disease as it was known in England in the 1600s and 1700s. In that era, there was one broad disease category, “venereal disease,” for what we...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Jan 2017

Witch's Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glass Courtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store. In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 31 Oct 2016

August 26

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Post-Boy (August 26, 1766).“George Beattie, From LONDON … works next Door to Mr. Jepson’s the Tinman. George Beattie seems to have been a metalsmith who produced...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Aug 2016

Witch’s Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glass Courtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store. In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2015

Gout and the Golden Fleece: Experimentation on Recipes through Chymical Correspondence

Michael Döring’s (d. 1641) gout and arthritis* pains were sometimes so severe that he could not leave his house on foot to visit patients throughout the city of Breslau (a.k.a. Wroclaw). Desperate to find a cure, or at least some … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2015

Making Drinkable Gold for the King of Siam

Tara Alberts, University of York  In a previous post I discussed how early modern Catholic missionaries sought to showcase the most up-to-date European medicines to impress their target audiences. This was also a key strategy used to gain access to …...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Feb 2015

The dose makes the poison: dangerous plants

By Marieke Hendriksen My current research focuses on how certain materials, particularly metals, gemstones and glass, mostly disappeared from the medicine of Boerhaave and his followers. This primarily had to do with how these substances were chemically...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Dec 2014

Witch’s Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 31 Oct 2014

Boerhaave’s contemporary fame: a letter from China to recipe books

By Marieke Hendriksen My current research project focuses on how Herman Boerhaave’s (1668-1738) medical and chemical ideas, particularly those on metals, influenced the theories and practices of his students and other followers. The longer I work...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 May 2014

Wilhelm Christoph Kriegsmann and the Secrets of Alchemical Symbolism

The eagerly expected second issue of the young, open-access journal Correspondences was released this past Saturday. Yours truly also contributed a substantial article on Wilhelm Christoph Kriegsmann (1635–79). Even so, there are several things that...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 12 May 2014

Metallic cures: antimonial wine and mineral kermes

By Marieke Hendriksen In my previous post, I wrote about the ubiquity of mercurial drugs in the long eighteenth century. Mercury is a metal we are all quite familiar with, yet a variety of cures was based on metals and … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Aug 2013

A gemstone for every ailment?

Last week, I wrote about Boerhaave’s admiration for the stained glass windows in the St. John church in Gouda, and how his appreciation can be understood in the context of his life and times. Yet of course, the learned man did not write about stained...
From: The Medicine Chest on 27 Jun 2013

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