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Your search for posts with tags containing Mexico found 37 posts

Cassava: From Toxic Tuber to Food Staple

By Christina Emery, Rachel Hirsch, and Melinda Susanto When eaten raw, cassava is likely to leave a bitter taste in one’s mouth. Worse still, the unprocessed plant, containing high levels of cyanide, is poisonous to humans and can paralyze when eaten....
From: The Recipes Project on 19 May 2022

Cacao: Indigenous Network to Global Commodity

By Rebecca Friedel A Coveted Tree  Theobroma cacao is a coveted tree known as the source of the globally celebrated chocolate, initially known as xocolatl in Nahuatl. The fruits of cacao are a variety of berry known as drupes. Drupes grow from pollinated...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 May 2022

Sickness Personified: Clandestine Remedies from Colonial Yucatán (Part 1)

By R.A. Kashanipour “I curse you, little seizures! Whose erupting pox are you? Eruptions on the head and body, open eruptions, internal eruptions, fiery eruptions…” [1] So begins a highly ritualized remedy for fever, eruptions, and seizures from...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Mar 2022

Surrealist “Counter-Revolution”: S.NOB and the Mexican Revolution of 196

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By David AJ Murrieta Flores In 1956, “México en la cultura”, a supplement of Mexico City-based...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Jan 2022

Dancing Revolution in the Caribbean Basin: Expressive and Revolutionary Movement and Moments in the History of New Orleans

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By Chris Smith The great bend in the lower Misi-ziibi (Ojibwe), as it flows to the Gulf of Mexico,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Nov 2021

“Very good are the words of the wise”: Plagues and Remedies of the Colonial Maya

By R.A. Kashanipour Early Spanish settlers, administrators, and chroniclers frequently lamented how Old World diseases ravaged native communities in the New World. The famed Dominican Bartolomé de Las Casas described the ferocity of the first epidemics:...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Oct 2021

Mapping a polycentric Republic of Letters in eighteenth-century Mexico

Map of Mexico or New Spain (1708), by Herman Moll. (Wikimedia Commons) The viceroyalty of New Spain – whose territory largely corresponded to that of present-day Mexico – was, during the eighteenth century, the most important...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 May 2021

Anáhuac & Rome: Converging Indigeneity and Religiosity in Mexico’s Republican Moment

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Arturo Chang After having read Fray Servando Teresa de...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Feb 2020

Visualizing the Plate: Reading Modernist Mexican Cuisine Through Colonial Botany

Lesley A. Wolff The eighteenth century’s Age of Enlightenment signaled an era of standardization for the visual and textual colonial taxonomies of resources in the Americas. These illustrations were intended for export to European elites, many of...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Dec 2019

When Medicine is a Sin: Sex and Heresy in Colonial Mexico

Farren Yero Laboring in the Mexican mining district of Real del Monte, José Antonio de la Peña met Manuel Arroyo in the summer of 1775. The two young men struck up a secret relationship, sharing a bed, a blanket, and a provocative cure for...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Dec 2019

On turning 75, NaNoWriMo and Day of the Dead

Tomorrow I turn 75. That will certainly be a milestone. Which of course made me curious about the word milestone. As with nearly all historical explorations, it proved to be exceptionally interesting. Milestones were originally stone obelisks –...
From: Baroque Explorations on 3 Nov 2019

Growing Pains: Pest Control and Agrochemicals in Mexico Between Revolutions, 1920-194

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 May 2019

“La Eme”—The Mexican Mafia

Robert Ramirez delves into the history of the infamous La Eme, better known as the Mexican Mafia. One of the most brutal gangs in existence is the Mexican Mafia, or, ‘La Eme’ (Spanish for ‘The M’). According to most accounts, the...

Dyed in the Grain

Dyeing wool cloth, from "Des Proprietez des Choses"Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269In his 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri presents a number of recipes for paint pigments used to decorate...
From: Conciatore on 14 Dec 2018

Mexican Cartels

By Carlos Rodriguez One of the first drug cartels in Mexico, the Guadalajara Cartel, was established by the notorious Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, also known as ‘the Godfather’. During the 1980s, he became the partner of the famous Pablo Escobar...

Dyed in the Grain

Dyeing wool cloth, from "Des Proprietez des Choses"Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269In his book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri presents a number of recipes for paint pigments used to decorate...
From: Conciatore on 9 Feb 2018

“speak like an ancient and most quiet watchman”: Much Ado About Nothing in the Summer of Love

By Kelsey Ridge, University of Birmingham This year, the Globe theatre flourishes its Summer of Love with Matthew Dunster’s Much Ado About Nothing set in 1914 Mexico during the first wave of Mexican revolution.  It’s an overall lively...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 30 Sep 2017

#VastEarlyAmerica(n) Girl Doll Books: Reflections of a Father and Historian

When Sara first pitched the idea of The Junto hosting a roundtable dedicated to children’s and young adult fiction focused on early America, I was excited. But unlike others, I was excited not because Johnny Tremaine was my favorite childhood read or...
From: The Junto on 7 Jun 2017

Roundtable: A Letter to Dear America

"My history books mostly shared facts about the lives of men–and rarely in great detail"-- Lindsay Chervinsky on how one children's series changed all that.
From: The Junto on 5 Jun 2017

Dyed In The Grain

Dyeing wool cloth, from "Des Proprietez des Choses" Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482 British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269 In his book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri presents a number of recipes for paint pigments used to decorate...
From: Conciatore on 27 Mar 2017

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