The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Militia"

Showing 1 - 20 of 273

Your search for posts with tags containing Militia found 273 posts

Their Pockets Filled with Paper Dollars: The Raid on Little Ferry

During the American Revolution, Bergen County, New Jersey, was flooded with combatants from all over America, many of whom had never been to the... The post Their Pockets Filled with Paper Dollars: The Raid on Little Ferry appeared first on Journal of...

“At the House of Mr. Daniel Harrington”

On 16 Oct 1769, Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette ran this news item with the dateline “Lexington, Aug. 31, 1769.”: Very early in the Morning, the young Ladies of this Town, to the Number of 45, assembled at the House of Mr. Daniel...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Aug 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial of New York Captain Joel Pratt

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor, independent researcher, and living historian Philip D. Weaver on the story of New York Captain... The post This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial...

“This British Drum was captured at Bunker Hill”?

Yesterday I quoted the traditional story of Levi Smith’s “Bunker Hill Drum,” as published in the Boston Globe in 1903.Some details of that story seems unlikely on their face. To start with, the drum allegedly came into American hands...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2019

Thomas Fletchall’s Association: A Loyalist Proclamation in the South Carolina Backcountry

Thomas Fletchall was a man of considerable influence in the South Carolina backcountry. Born in Maryland in 1725, Fletchall and his family relocated to... The post Thomas Fletchall’s Association: A Loyalist Proclamation in the South Carolina Backcountry...

The Road to Charleston: Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution

The Road to Charleston, Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution by John Buchanan (University Press of Virginia, 2019) John Buchanan’s latest account of the southern theater... The post The Road to Charleston: Nathanael Greene and...

“Here comes A new or A Strange Lobster”

I’ve gotten away from reporting on what was happening in Boston 250 years ago, but this date offers a chance to catch up.John Ruddock was the North End’s big man. He owned a shipyard and thus employed a large number of laborers. He was a justice...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jun 2019

When Wartime Riots Paralyzed London

On 2 June 1780, as I described yesterday, a crowd of over 50,000 people surrounded Parliament while Lord George Gordon presented a petition demanding a return to strictures on Catholics.The House of Commons dismissed that petition, and the crowd dispersed...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2019

Appel de Textes — Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique : études des milices au Canada atlantique, 17

Présentation : L’Institut d’études acadiennes de l’Université de Moncton, le Gregg Centre for Study of War and Society, incluant le Network for the Study of Civilians, Soldiers and Society, et le Département...
From: Borealia on 13 May 2019

Call for Papers — Military Service, Citizenship and Political Culture: Militia Studies in Atlantic Canada, 17

Introduction: The Institut d’études acadiennes at the Université de Moncton, the Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society at the University of New Brunswick, and the Department of History at the University of New Brunswick including...
From: Borealia on 13 May 2019

Pickering on the Beginning of the Siege

Earlier this week the Journal of the American Revolution made the first publication of a 21 Apr 1775 letter by Timothy Pickering, colonel of the Essex County militia. The letter now belongs to the Harlan Crow Library in Dallas.The title of library...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 May 2019

Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown

Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown by Stanley D.M. Carpenter (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019) In his recent book, Stanley Carpenter produced... The post Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown...

Lt. Isaac Potter as a House Guest

We have a couple of glimpses of Lt. Isaac Potter as an involuntary guest of Concord harness-marker Reuben Brown after the start of the Revolutionary War.Earlier this year Joel Bohy alerted me to a passage from the diary of Ralph Waldo Emerson dated 5...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Apr 2019

“Drive them British from that bridge”

As I discussed yesterday, the militia companies from the western side of Sudbury were better equipped than those on the east side. Under Lt. Col. Ezekiel How, Capt. Aaron Haynes, and Capt. John Nixon, they responded first when the alarm arrived on 19...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2019

A Snapshot of the Sudbury Militia in Spring 1775

I’m cleverly using yesterday’s break for event announcements to segue away from Lexington on 19 Apr 1775 and on to Concord. Or, actually, to Sudbury.Ezekiel How (1720-1796) was a veteran of the Seven Years’ War and a lieutenant colonel...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Apr 2019

Lt. William Sutherland’s Wild Ride

Yesterday I quoted (Alexander Cain quoting) Lt. William Tidd of the Lexington militia company on how a mounted British officer had chased him off the common on 19 Apr 1775.I suspect that officer was Lt. William Sutherland, and he wasn’t chasing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2019

A memorial for the present age

Title: A memorial for the present age, and information to posterity, of the loyalty, patriotic zeal, and spirited exertions of the citizens of Bristol: being an account of the cause, rise, progress, and military improvement of the volunteers of the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 22 Apr 2019

“At wch time they took from him his gun”

Over at Historical Nerdery, Alexander Cain found a new source about the fight of Lexington: the claims that militiamen from that town made to the Massachusetts legislature seeking compensation for items lost in the skirmish.Specifically, they complained...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Apr 2019

Ebenezer Lock at Lexington

Ebenezer Lock (1732-1816) was at Lexington on the morning of 19 Apr 1775. He’s often listed among the militiamen on the town common that day, but with an asterisk, because he wasn’t really. Lock lived in Woburn and was enrolled in that town’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.