The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Monks"

Your search for posts with tags containing Monks found 18 posts

A representation of the present state of France

“Napoleon, pushing an officer before him through a pillared doorway, looks back to speak to a monk and a sansculotte, shackled together, who drag a car in which is an imperial crown. They hold a large scroll inscribed: ‘Most religious Sovereign –...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Aug 2022

Tirania

Ferdinand VII, seated on a throne on a low platform inscribed “TIRANIA”, is flanked by two advisers, the Devil on the left and a friar on the right. At the friar’s feet, in the foreground, a demon burns newspapers with a firebrand. Tortures of the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 1 Oct 2021

The Yorkshire Little Man

For regular readers you may recall that we have written several articles about ‘dwarfs and giants’, John Coan, ‘The Norfolk Dwarf’ and at the other end of the height scale, Frances Flower, the ‘Nottinghamshire/Yorkshire Giantess’...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Jul 2020

Knock and ye shall enter

“An archaic iron-studded door, with posts and lintel of solid but ancient oak, represents the door of the ‘COMMONS’ [inscription on lintel]. Above: ‘”They of Rome are enter’d in our Counsels Sh.’ [‘Coriolanus’,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 May 2019

A scene in a nunnery garden

Two young women, attired in low-cut, fine dresses, their veils pulled back over their hair exposing their pretty, young faces, sit in a semi-embrace on a blue loveseat in a garden, one looking lovingly into the eyes of the other with her hand posed to...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 Dec 2018

Journal Article: The Mysticism of Augustine Baker

The historical memory of Augustine (né David) Baker has been that of a ‘saintly’ figure, asubmissive and genteel contemplative who wished for nothing more than to be left aloneto foster a state of mystical passivity. However, Baker...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 7 Nov 2017

Journal Article: The Mysticism of Augustine Baker

The historical memory of Augustine (né David) Baker has been that of a ‘saintly’ figure, asubmissive and genteel contemplative who wished for nothing more than to be left aloneto foster a state of mystical passivity. However, Baker...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 7 Nov 2017

IMEMS Fellowship: Exploring the manuscripts of the English Poor Clares

In 2007 Durham University Library was gifted the lion’s share of the library of the English Poor Clares. Consisting of 796 printed works and 74 manuscripts, the extensive collection contains what remains of the libraries of the four major English...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 12 Oct 2017

IMEMS Fellowship: Exploring the manuscripts of the English Poor Clares

In 2007 Durham University Library was gifted the lion’s share of the library of the English Poor Clares. Consisting of 796 printed works and 74 manuscripts, the extensive collection contains what remains of the libraries of the four major English...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 12 Oct 2017

Married Priests in France, 1789-1815

By Xavier Marechaux In a previous post on this blog, Kate Marsden described the fate of hundreds of nuns who married during the French Revolution, shedding light on a topic often considered taboo.[1] However, married nuns were not the only population...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Jul 2017

Making Modern Gender Roles: The Case of Married Nuns in the French Revolution

“Sexing Histories of Revolution” Roundtable – Post #2 In this series, contributors explore sex and sexual revolutions in the revolutionary era.  By Kate Marsden The French Revolution of 1789 is more often connected...
From: Age of Revolutions on 19 Apr 2017

IMEMS Fellowship: Mysticism among the English Poor Clares

I am delighted to be joining Durham University as an IMEMS Library Fellow in April and May. During my time there I will be researching a project entitled 'Mysticism among the English Poor Clares, 1580-1680'. The project will engage with the remains of...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 29 Mar 2017

IMEMS Fellowship: Mysticism among the English Poor Clares

I am delighted to be joining Durham University as an IMEMS Library Fellow in April and May. During my time there I will be researching a project entitled ‘Mysticism among the English Poor Clares, 1580-1680’. The project will engage with the...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 29 Mar 2017

Exploring an abandoned 18th-century encyclopedia: an academic detective story

Eighteenth-century Paris was a vibrant centre of scholarly activity, publishing, and consumption. As the number of printed works multiplied, the demand for condensed up-to-date summaries of all fields of knowledge increased. In my book The Maurists’...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 10 Feb 2017

Conference Report: Reformation Studies Colloquium, Newcastle

The Reformation Studies Colloquium took place in Newcastle between Wednesday 14th and Friday 16th September. The event was well attended and featured speakers from a variety of countries. I was lucky enough to be able to enjoy all three days of the conference...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 18 Sep 2016

Wife & no wife, or, A trip to the Continent

“The interior of a large church or cathedral. Burke, dressed as a Jesuit, standing within a low, semicircular wall at the foot of a crucifix, marries the Prince of Wales and Mrs. Fitzherbert. The Prince is about to put the ring on her finger. Fox...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 Jan 2016

Pop Culture and Medmenham

As those of you who follow this blog know, it’s been inactive for a while.  This is because I took a new position at my university and haven’t had time to do the necessary research.  One of the things that I have been working on is adding...
From: Secrets of the Hellfire Club on 6 Jan 2013

6 Reasons Dashwood’s Monks Sucked at Satanism

The moralist may want to decry the Monks of Medmenham as holy terrors, devil-begotten and dancing down the moon, but in reality they were Rabelasians. Were they bawdy?  Of course.  Hedonistic?  Definitely.  But Satanists?  I think not.
From: Life Takes Lemons on 23 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.