The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Muses"

Your search for posts with tags containing Muses found 7 posts

The stage medley

“Satire on the popularity of the Beggar’s Opera in the form of a medley print.” Title: The stage medley [graphic] : representing the polite tast [sic] of the Town & the matchless merits of Poet G- Polly Peachum and Captn. Macheath....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 May 2019

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 74

I never drank of Aganippe well, Nor ever did in shade of Tempe sit; And muses scorn with vulgar brains to dwell; Poor layman I, for sacred rites unfit. Some do I hear of poet’s fury tell, But (God wot) wot not what they mean by it; And this I swear,...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 2 May 2015

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 60

When my good angel guides me to the place Where all my good I do in Stella see, That heaven of joys throws only down on me Thundered disdains and lightnings of disgrace: But when the ruggedest step of fortune’s race Makes me fall from her sight,...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 17 Oct 2014

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 55

Muses, I oft invoked your holy aid, With choicest flowers my speech to engarland so That it, despised in true but naked show, Might win some grace in your sweet grace arrayed; And oft whole troops of saddest words I stayed, Striving abroad a-foraging...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 8 Aug 2014

Thomas Heywood’s women

Engraving based on Isaac Oliver’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth About a week ago I wrote about the extraordinary playwright, poet, prose writer and actor Thomas Heywood whose work is being investigated at the Shakespeare Institute’s Heywood...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jun 2014

Pantomime Snobbery

George Colman the Younger The following piece of criticism appeared in the Monthly Review in 1798:  Blue Beard, or Female Curiosity, a Dramatic Romance, by George Colman, the Younger.  ‘The author of this piece professes that, a pantomime not...
From: Abraham Adcock on 30 Jan 2014

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 15

You that do search for every purling spring Which from the ribs of old Parnassus flows; And every flower, not sweet perhaps, which grows Near thereabouts into your poesy wring; You that do dictionary’s method bring Into your rhymes, running in rattling...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 24 Jan 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.