The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Music"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Music found 684 posts

“‘Nae Luck aboot the House” in Braintree

Gwen Fries at the Massachusetts Historical Society highlighted how Abigail Adams came to love a particular Scottish song while her husband John was far away in France. On 13 Dec 1778, after describing lonely winter nights, Adams wrote:I cannot discribe...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2019

Harriette Wilson (1786-1845), courtesan, and her siblings

For anyone not familiar with Harriette Dubochet who used the assumed surname of Wilson whilst alive, (although when buried her baptismal name was given) we would definitely recommend both volumes of her memoirs published in 1825, as they make fascinating...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Apr 2019

Sei Duetti … Dedicati a … la … Marchesana di Rockingamme

Creator: Giardini, Felice, 1716-1796. Title: Sei Duetti … Dedicati a … la … Marchesana di Rockingamme. Created: [London], [1762] Catalog Record 74 762 Se457 Acquired April 2018
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Apr 2019

French drummer

Tambour des Cent-Suisses de la Maison du roi. École française. Milieu du XVIIIe siècle. Huile sur toile. Château de Versailles.
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 11 Apr 2019

April 3

GUEST CURATOR: Aidan Griffin What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Chronicle (April 3, 1769). “A GRAND CONCERT of VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC.” Music was popular in colonial America, just like it...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Apr 2019

March 26

GUEST CURATOR: Sean Duda What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Supplement to the New-York Journal (March 23, 1769). “A HARPSICHORD, completely fitted, Maker’s Name (Mahoon, London:).” This brief...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Mar 2019

Call for Papers: Early American Music and the Construction of Race

Today, the Junto shares a call for papers that may be of interest to our readers
From: The Junto on 2 Mar 2019

Hudibras’s first adventure

Hudibras and Ralpho encounter a mob armed with sticks; in the foreground to right, a one-legged fiddler, a butcher and a dancing bear with his leader. On the left, a woman reaches out her arms. Printmaker: Hogarth, William, 1697-1764, printmaker....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Feb 2019

Review of Alphaville: Live at the Whisky a Go Go. From Hollywood with Love (2018)

Alphaville's two-night extravanganza at the Whisky a Go Go makes a late but compelling case that they are much more than a synth-pop band. … More Review of Alphaville: Live at the Whisky a Go Go. From Hollywood with Love (2018)
From: Writing Privacy on 23 Feb 2019

“A concert hall is again opened to all”

At the end of January 1769, the Boston Whigs told newspapers in other towns, British army officers behaved so badly at a musical concert that the hosts canceled all further scheduled performances. But on 6 Feb 1769, the Whig-leaning Boston Gazette and...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2019

“They grew noisy and clamorous”

Yesterday left us inside the 25 Jan 1769 musical assembly at Boston’s first Concert Hall (shown here in a photo almost a century later, after the building had been expanded). Following the concert, some army officers wanted to dance. Organizers...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Feb 2019

A Concert “turned topsy turvy”

Though the Boston Whigs sneered that few young ladies attended the 22 Dec 1768 musical assembly at Concert Hall (as quoted yesterday), the 29 December Boston News-Letter gave the event more respectful coverage:Thursday evening, the Assembly...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Feb 2019

“A sort of an assembly at Concert Hall”

Yesterday we left the Boston Whigs in mid-December 1768 crowing over the failure of pro-Crown officials and army officers to pull off a dancing assembly. That triumph didn’t last, however, and on 23 December the Whigs had to report:It may now be...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Feb 2019

“A weekly and brilliant assembly at Concert Hall”?

It was no coincidence that James Joan moved from Halifax to Boston in October 1768, just as the 14th and 29th Regiments made the same journey. In fact, the same sloop that brought Joan and his family, Nehemiah Soanes’s Ranger, might well have carried...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2019

The Boston Debut of James Joan

Early in October 1768 a family arrived in Boston from Halifax: James Joan (also spelled Juhan and Juan); his wife Mary; their children Mary, Alexander, Martin, and John; and their maidservant Ann Lederai. In traditional Boston fashion, a town official...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Feb 2019

“Entertainments” for the 2019 Dublin Seminar

This summer’s Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife is on the topic of “Entertainments at Taverns and Long Rooms in New England, 1700-1900.” The seminar organizers are now accepting proposals for papers, presentations, and performances...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2019

The procession of the Lord Mayor of London

“Stylised representation of the Lord Mayor’s procession, framing a blank space in the centre of the sheet; two rows of figures at the top, 7 groups one above the other to either side, and the City Counsel on foot, the Aldermen and Lord Mayor...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Jan 2019

The “Nutrition Song”: Imperial Japan’s Recipe for National Nutrition

Nathan Hopson This is the first in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. In May 1922, Japan’s preeminent nutritionist, Saiki Tadasu, released a recording of his “Nutrition Song,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Jan 2019

An Eventful 1851 in Salem

The media—exclusively newspapers—looked back at the year’s events at its end in the nineteenth century just as it does today. This accounting was traditionally presented in the first few days of January by the Salem Observer, and...
From: streets of salem on 2 Jan 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.