The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Musicians"

Showing 1 - 20 of 26

Your search for posts with tags containing Musicians found 26 posts

Civic London Project in the OED

Research from the Civic London project has made it into the Oxford English Dictionary, with an early use of an unusual word for a musician. ‘Dromsler’, an early modern word for a drum player, was found in the Pewterers’ Company Audit...

The fair in an uproar

With a large woodcut below the title and preceding the letterpress text: Madamoiselle Javellot is shown on stage flanked on either side by chandeliers wtih her performing dogs in costumes in front and a musician in the background, left, behind the curtain....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Jun 2019

Jubilee Fair

“View of the Jubilee Fair in Hyde Park; in foreground to left a small stage erected with a band playing and jesters performing, a small crowd stands in front, a few tents in central foreground with signs such as “Duke of Wellington Whitbreads...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Jun 2019

Hudibras’s first adventure

Hudibras and Ralpho encounter a mob armed with sticks; in the foreground to right, a one-legged fiddler, a butcher and a dancing bear with his leader. On the left, a woman reaches out her arms. Printmaker: Hogarth, William, 1697-1764, printmaker....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Feb 2019

The procession of the Lord Mayor of London

“Stylised representation of the Lord Mayor’s procession, framing a blank space in the centre of the sheet; two rows of figures at the top, 7 groups one above the other to either side, and the City Counsel on foot, the Aldermen and Lord Mayor...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Jan 2019

The wedding day

“The fat, moustached, Duchess of St. Albans and the slim Duke dance with vigour and agility, each poised on the left toe, arms interlaced, and hands meeting above their heads. From the Duchess’s small coronet rise giant ostrich feathers which...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Oct 2018

Musicians Who Deserted

There were drummers, there were fifers, and then there were men who had general musical talent, capable of playing several instruments. Many British, American... The post Musicians Who Deserted appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A French (R)evolution in Music?

By Rebecca Dowd Geoffroy-Schwinden The American media seems to foreground the affinities between music and politics during election years. The Rolling Stones, Adele, R.E.M., and many other musicians have publicly confronted the Trump campaign for using...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Sep 2016

jeannepompadour: "A Family Concert at Chateau Renescure" French...

jeannepompadour: "A Family Concert at Chateau Renescure" French School,18th century Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings because I have to get some other work done. Will be a day late with ECF original post: look...

necspenecmetu: Circle of Jacques-Louis David, Portrait of the...

necspenecmetu: Circle of Jacques-Louis David, Portrait of the Flautist Francois Devienne, c. 1792 Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings because I have to get some other work done. Will be a day late with ECF original...

necspenecmetu: Jean-Baptiste Greuze, The Guitarist,...

necspenecmetu: Jean-Baptiste Greuze, The Guitarist, 1757 Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings because I have to get some other work done. Will be a day late with ECF original post: look for it here tomorrow. Visit...

kecobe: Antoine Watteau (French; 1684–1721)A Man Playing the...

kecobe: Antoine Watteau (French; 1684–1721)A Man Playing the Guitar Troiscrayons (three chalks) on paper, 1717–18 Private Collection Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings and drawings because I have to get some...

orangexocoatl: Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux, Self-Portrait with a...

orangexocoatl: Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux, Self-Portrait with a Harp, 1790. Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings because I have to get some other work done. Will be a day late with ECF original post: look for it here...

jeannepompadour: "Concert" by Gaspare Traversi,c....

jeannepompadour: "Concert" by Gaspare Traversi,c. 1760 Reposting today a few “musical instruments” in 18th-century paintings because I have to get some other work done. Will be a day late with ECF original post: look for it here tomorrow. Visit...

La Moustache, 1815

As it turns out, waiting until someone falls asleep and then drawing a fake moustache on them is not a new phenomenon – still hilarious after 200 years. Nice to see some immature nineteenth-century behaviour immortalised in print… (not entirely...
From: The History of Love on 4 Nov 2013

The muse so oft her silver harp has strung …

An elderly man plays his harp on a hillside surrounded by couples and children. In the distance are mountains and a tower. Title from the first line of the four-line poem printed below the image.Title continues: “… That not a mountain rears...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Jul 2013

From crumhorns to waterphone: Music for Shakespeare

Crumhorns Shakespeare’s use of music is always a popular subject, but just now it seems to be everywhere. Shakespeare’s Globe is hosting a conference on Shakespeare, music and performance from 3-5 May, which will include input from major academics...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Apr 2013

Mrs Wilson: from Garrick's equal to affectation

On Wednesday the 9th April 1777 Samuel Curwen walked to the Covent Garden Theatre to see a production of Sheridan's Duenna followed by Wycherley's Country Wife. He was bewitched by the actress Mrs. Wilson writing that,  'the Duenna and Country...
From: 18th Century Theatre on 19 Jan 2013

Sarah Kemble's (Siddons) Family Tree

  The library at the Society of Genealogists is a wondrous thing and for those of us who are fortunate enough to pass the hours of the day in such magical places, we often find they divulge their secrets slowly. After nearly twenty years of membership...
From: 18th Century Theatre on 16 Nov 2012

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.