The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "National Trust"

Your search for posts with tags containing National Trust found 16 posts

Slavery Siege in Salem

The occupants of a house on Bryant Street in North Salem experienced a very scary night in late October of 1835, and I am not referencing Halloween. For this Preservation Month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has selected the theme (or charge)...
From: streets of salem on 21 May 2021

Seven Women of Salem: the Preservationists

I’ve been rather depressed about the state of historic preservation in Salem: after a strong commitment in response to full scale urban renewal in the 1960s and early 1970s we seem to be awash in a sea of vinyl siding and shed dormers. I’m...
From: streets of salem on 23 May 2020

80 Years of Care

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the National Trust for Scotland caring for and conserving Culloden Battlefield. Culloden Battlefield  In 1937 Alexander Munro of Leanach Farm presented the first two small pieces of the battlefield to...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 27 May 2017

Ready for a new adventure?

The National Trust for Scotland is lucky enough to have thousands of people volunteering with us to help conserve properties, artefacts and landscapes in our care and help provide fantastic experiences to all our visitors. However, you may not...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 3 Feb 2017

History in Action

Among the amazing castles, homes, gardens and, of course, battlefields that the National Trust for Scotland looks after there are some great places of industrial heritage which we thought we’d take a little look at today. Firstly, one of our favourites,...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 9 Dec 2016

FAQ’s

We get many questions asked here at Culloden so to help clear a few things up here are our most common queries. Culloden Memorial Cairn   Where does the name Jacobite come from? We talk about the Jacobites a lot but don’t mention the origin...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 25 Nov 2016

Famous Birthplaces

The NTS looks after some amazing properties and landscapes across Scotland, and therefore, it is unsurprising that we have some fascinating links to some Scottish icons. Here we take a look at a few of our favourite famous connections by exploring the...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 4 Nov 2016

Glenfinnan Monument

Glenfinnan Monument marks the beginning of the 1745 Jacobite Rising and makes a beautiful partner to the battlefield of Culloden, where the Rising met its end. Today we look into the history of the monument and the site where it stands. Glenfinnan Monument...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 14 Oct 2016

Something off the beaten track…

Most of the properties the National Trust for Scotland looks after are pretty well known and are easy to find on the map but there are a few that are tucked a little bit away from the main path. Today we choose a few of our favourite lesser known properties....
From: Culloden Battlefield on 12 Aug 2016

5 Great Summer Walks

With summer heading our way, and hopefully some wonderful weather to go with it, we’re taking a look at some of the best walks the NTS has to offer.   Pathways of exotic plants at Inverewe GardensFirstly Inverewe Gardens. Perfect for a...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 10 Jun 2016

Looking forward to spring and the art of the garden

A page from Ruralia Commoda The British love affair with gardening is well-known, and opening on 20 March and running until 11 October is an exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace called Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden. Building...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 4 Mar 2015

Fact or fiction: Shakespeare at Charlecote

E W Haslehust’s painting of the gatehouse at Charlecote House There are many legends about Shakespeare’s life, but none is more compelling than that linking him with Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon. Local historian Dr Robert Bearman...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 3 Mar 2014

To move, astonish and delight mankind: Shakespeare at Stowe

The British Worthies With the extravagance of the Chelsea Flower Show behind us, and gardens and open spaces looking at their best, summer has finally started. Shakespeare has always been associated with nature, writing about flowers, plants and the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 May 2013

Lacock Abbey

Lacock Abbey. All photos: Melanie Clegg. The sun is finally starting to come out in the south west so we decided to make the most of it by heading to nearby Lacock Abbey for a day of historical treats which had the additional bonus of giving me a bit...
From: Madame Guillotine on 21 Apr 2013

A Great Storm, Ominous Fish in Fife and the Societies’ Declaration of War.

‘On the 27, and 28, and following days of October 1684, happened a great storme of snow and frost, with thunder and lightening and much shipwrack of many wessells at sea; and Holland was afraid to have been drowned, ther banks was so shattered with...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 12 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.