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Search Results for "Naval History"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Naval History found 129 posts

On Tour: A New Angle on HMS Victory

Time to resume (fairly) regular blogging! The recent hiatus has been due partly to various commitments, but also to a sense that I had nothing new to blog about. Recently, though, I’ve done a little travelling, the first in six months, and also...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 28 Sep 2020

Bored Now: or, Captain Blood Plays Another Game of Solitaire

Maritime history has provided me with many satisfying and pleasurable moments since I started studying it seriously *cough* years ago, but there’s something a bit special about chairing a conference session where [a] all the speakers are running...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Sep 2019

Revisiting The Death of the Naval Pub

Holiday time, i.e. minimal opportunity to think about blogging, but in any case, I thought it was high time I re-posted one of the most popular posts ever on this site – I can’t quite believe I first published this here almost five years ago!...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 4 Mar 2019

Tidal Wave

At long last, I’m thrilled to be able to confirm that the first book in my new Tudor naval fiction trilogy will be published by Canelo this summer, currently as an e-book only. And the title is… Cue drumroll! Cue trumpets!!...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 21 Jan 2019

Commemoration of the four great naval victories…

Plates engraved by F. Bartolozzi, I. Landseer, J. Parker, Geo. Noble, Lenney, and W. Bromley after paintings by R. Smirke, miniatures by John Smart, and after portraits by Ryder, Stow, and Worthington. Title: Commemoration of the four great naval...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Jan 2019

Special issue of Open Access Journal Humanities about Pirates in Literature

Aargh, avast ye!  The Open Access journal Humanities is seeking submissions for a special issue about Pirates in Literature.  If this is of interest, please follow this link to the Humanities website and a description of manuscript submission.

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers, at the Royal Museums, Greenwich

“Adventure, Power Wealth.”  Piggott Family Gallery, Tudor and Stuart Seafarers, at the Royal Museums, Greenwich.  If you like model ships, you will like this exhibit.

Review: The New Tudor and Stuart Seafarers Gallery at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

A disclaimer: this post has been written and posted rather more rapidly than usual, as it was only yesterday evening (19 September) that I went with the ‘LadyQJ’ of my Twitter feed (aka Wendy) to the launch event for the four new permanent...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 20 Sep 2018

Sounding the Trumpet

I don’t often review books to which I’ve contributed, but this week, I’m going to make an exception and do a bit of trumpet blowing. During the last couple of weeks, the post has brought, inter alia, two complimentary copies of...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 Aug 2018

Soldier No More

I’ve been largely maintaining ‘radio silence’ on both the blogging and social media fronts for the last few weeks. This is due to a combination of factors: wanting to concentrate on finishing my new Tudor naval novel (hunky dory, since...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 25 Jun 2018

Art

Time for some culture, although I can’t help thinking of a quote I first came across when teaching Mussolini’s Italy to schoolchildren some 30 years ago: ‘when I hear the word “culture”, I reach for my gun,’ said, yes,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 26 Feb 2018

“One Year of the Sea! There’s Only One Year of the Sea!”

A version of this post would have been my first of the year, and would have been published some weeks ago, had not more pressing matters intervened. *** So it’s 2018, the Wales Year of the Sea. Or so the marketing gurus who came up with the concept...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Feb 2018

Merry Christmas from the Restoration Navy!

A festive re-post from the very first Christmas of this blog, namely 2012… *** Henry Teonge, a Warwickshire clergyman, was fifty-five when he first went to sea as a naval chaplain, presumably forced into the job by the extent of his debts. In 1675...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 20 Dec 2017

Dead Admirals Society Dons a Kilt

Apologies for the ‘radio silence’ last week. Regular followers of this blog will know that I sometimes take myself off to Landmark Trust cottages to brainstorm new novels or just to chill, and I spent last week at the tiny but perfectly formed...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 27 Nov 2017

Dead Admirals Society Goes Danish

In last week’s two posts, I talked about the lovely Swedish city of Karlskrona, and the international conference on dockyards that I attended there. I bookended the trip with stays in Copenhagen, which I’d never visited before – a shocking...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 30 Oct 2017

Don’t Mention the Cold War, Part

In this week’s first post, I gave my impressions of the dockyard town of Karlskrona and its terrific naval museum. Now on to the reason why I was there, an international conference on International Approaches to Naval Cities and Dockyards, held...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 26 Oct 2017

Don’t Mention the Cold War, Part 1

Last week, I was in Karlskrona, Sweden, attending and speaking at a conference on dockyards and port cities organised by the Swedish Naval Museum. It was my first ever visit to the town, and shamefully, that’s also true of Copenhagen, where I stopped...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 23 Oct 2017

Scandinavia or Bust

A quick post this week, as I’m busy tidying up loose ends and packing before heading off to Scandinavia! I’m speaking at a conference in the Swedish Naval Museum, Karlskrona, and am ‘bookending’ the trip with overnight stays in...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 16 Oct 2017

The Top Ten

I’m not tweeting very much at the moment, as I’m largely keeping my head down and working on my new Tudor project, but the other day, I had a bit of a brainwave, and tweeted a ‘top ten’ of the most popular posts ever (in terms...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 9 Oct 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.