The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Naval historical fiction"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Naval historical fiction found 44 posts

Bored Now: or, Captain Blood Plays Another Game of Solitaire

Maritime history has provided me with many satisfying and pleasurable moments since I started studying it seriously *cough* years ago, but there’s something a bit special about chairing a conference session where [a] all the speakers are running...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Sep 2019

England’s Atlantis

My new novel, Destiny’s Tide, is being published by Canelo in e-book form on 26 June, and is currently available for pre-order. (It’s currently ‘headlining’ their website as Book of the Month!) To build up to the book’s release,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 May 2019

Tidal Wave

At long last, I’m thrilled to be able to confirm that the first book in my new Tudor naval fiction trilogy will be published by Canelo this summer, currently as an e-book only. And the title is… Cue drumroll! Cue trumpets!!...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 21 Jan 2019

The Agonising

As far as I’m aware, there’s no collective noun for a gathering of historical novelists; but if there was, it would probably be ‘an agonising’. This was demonstrated in spades last week, at the 2018 conference of the Historical...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 27 Aug 2018

Serendipity

Sometimes – very, very rarely, but sometimes – thinks click together in an unexpected but beautiful, seemingly preordained way. This is the moment called ‘serendipity’, and it’s doubly appropriate in this case, as that was...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 22 May 2018

Merry Christmas from the Restoration Navy!

A festive re-post from the very first Christmas of this blog, namely 2012… *** Henry Teonge, a Warwickshire clergyman, was fifty-five when he first went to sea as a naval chaplain, presumably forced into the job by the extent of his debts. In 1675...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 20 Dec 2017

The Sandwich of Xanadu

Last week, I went along to the Historical Writers’ Association Christmas bash. This is always great fun – it’s good to touch base with one’s fellow practitioners, especially because our line of work is, by definition, pretty solitary....
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 11 Dec 2017

How Not to Write a Tudor Novel

A few months ago, I announced my exciting new project – three linked naval fiction stories, set in the Tudor period, which will eventually combine together to be published as one ‘traditional’ book by the splendid new imprint, Endeavour...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 8 Aug 2017

Books. Beer. What’s Not to Like?

It is a truth not universally acknowledged that Jane Austen brewed her own beer, so I have absolutely no doubt that, as she looks down upon all the events marking the bicentenary of her death, the great author would thoroughly approve of Open Book, the...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Jul 2017

The Devil Upon the Wave – Teaser Trailer

To mark the publication by Endeavour Press of the new Quinton title, The Devil Upon the Wave, I’m delighted to provide a treat for my loyal readers and followers of this blog – namely, the first few pages of the book. *** Here, Painter,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 2 Jul 2017

Amsterdam Good Time, Part 1

And so it continued. Not content with fireworks, rowing contests, schoolchildren’s chain-making competitions, and exhibitions galore, it was finally time for the historians to have their four-penn’orth about the 350th anniversary of the Battle...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 28 Jun 2017

I’m a Doctor – Why Can’t I have a Tardis?

What, you mean doctorates in History don’t count? But a Tardis would have been very useful over the weekend, when I was in Portsmouth for the AGM of the Society for Nautical Research, followed by a splendid dinner on the lower gundeck of HMS Victory,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Jun 2017

And So It Begins

It’s a little known fact that ‘June’ is derived from a Latin word which means ‘don’t even think of trying to cram anything else into your diary’. That’s certainly the case for me this month, as I embark on the...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 5 Jun 2017

At Last It Can Be Told!

Cue fanfare from massed ranks of trumpeters, plus assorted Welsh male voice choirs… I can finally reveal the really exciting news that I’ve had to keep under wraps for several months. My e-book publisher, the fantastic Endeavour Press, is...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 27 Feb 2017

Merry Christmas from the Raging Quintons!

For the final post on this site in 2016 – and wasn’t that just the most nondescript year ever? – I thought I’d provide a Christmas treat for all loyal readers of both this blog and my books. I mentioned recently that Endeavour...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Dec 2016

Flashing Blades and Swashing Buckles Revisited

Pretty full on with work and Christmas-related commitments this week, so I thought I’d reblog a post from four and a half years ago – which, although, it’s probably immodest to admit it, is ohttps://jddavies.com/2015/08/05/admiral-compress-and-conflate/ne...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 Dec 2016

A New Era

At long last, after having to keep things under wraps for some time, I’m finally able to reveal some really exciting news! Firstly, great news for all Quinton fans – the series continues! Next year, the 350th anniversary of the Dutch attack...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 5 Dec 2016

Game of Hats

Back after a terrific weekend at the Historical Novel Society conference in Oxford. Yes, there were big guns – Melvyn Bragg, Fay Weldon et al – but as always at such events, the information and ideas coming out of the panel sessions were more...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 5 Sep 2016

Incoming Angel, Part

The publication of Death’s Bright Angel, the new Quinton novel, is getting ever closer, so here’s another ‘teaser trailer’ for the book! This describes the destruction of the Dutch merchant shipping in the Vlie anchorage on...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 15 Aug 2016

Incoming Angel!

Well, it’s August, which means the publication of Death’s Bright Angel, the latest Matthew Quinton adventure, is ever more imminent! To mark both this and the fast approaching 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, which forms...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 1 Aug 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.