The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Networks"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Networks found 153 posts

Tales from the Archives: Community Conversations

The theme for this month is community, inspired by the UK university strikes in February and March.  Community is at the heart of the dispute: what do we want universities to look like? The wonderful sense of community that emerges on picket lines...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Mar 2020

A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community

By Christian Reynolds From October to December 2019, the US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network ran a community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Mar 2020

January 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SPAIN, PORTUGAL, LONDON … The SHIP MARY.” Deciphering the copy in these advertisements may be difficult or even impossible, but the visual images remain...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2020

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2020

The JAR 2019 Book-of-the-Year Award Finalists

The Journal of the American Revolution is pleased to announce the five finalists for the 2019 JAR Book-of-the-Year Award. In alphabetical order: The British Are... The post The JAR 2019 Book-of-the-Year Award Finalists appeared first on Journal of...

A Band of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558 depiction; a...
From: Conciatore on 23 Dec 2019

British? Or European?: George III’s dinner table and the taste of the nation, 1788-1801

By Rachel Rich and Lisa Smith If we are what we eat, and the king is the father of the nation, then George III’s menus must have something to tell us about who the British people were at the end of the eighteenth century, as Britain moved from early...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2019

Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789

Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789  by Joseph M. Adelman (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019) An explosion of new... The post Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing...

Digitization of the Enlightenment and Manifold Scholarship

Last month, Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment released the first volume in the long history of the series that is devoted to the application of digital humanities methods to the study of eighteenth-century intellectual life, Networks...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Jul 2019

July 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (July 8, 1769). “Subscriptions for the American Magazine, published in Philadelphia.” On behalf of Lewis Nicola, the editor of the American Magazine,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Jul 2019

A Band of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558 depiction; a...
From: Conciatore on 20 May 2019

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2019

Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the Irish: Networks of Diaspora in Early-Twentieth Century Northeastern North America

Patrick Mannion On October 4th, 1920, Irish-Canadian nationalist Katherine Hughes arrived in St. John’s, the capital and chief port of the Dominion of Newfoundland. Her objective was to establish a branch of the Self-Determination for Ireland League...
From: Borealia on 17 Dec 2018

IJBS Regional Day Conference, Loughborough 2019

HONEST LABOUR:  EXPORING THE INTERFACE BETWEEN WORK AND NONCONFORMITY We are delighted to announce the CFP for the 2019 Day Conference of the IJBS that will take place this year at Loughborough University on Friday 5 April 2019. This one-day...
From: Dissenting Experience on 16 Dec 2018

Appraising Affect in the Transatlantic Correspondence of Richard Popham and John Large

Michael Borsk When the Irish merchant Richard Popham found that his fortunes in New York had turned sour during the fall of 1826, he penned a letter to his acquaintance living in Upper Canada, John Large. “My mind is in a dreadful state of agitation,”...
From: Borealia on 19 Nov 2018

‘The Cholera Manuscript’: A collection of recipes and cures from Co Limerick

By Dorothy Cashman Several years ago a manuscript collection of recipes came up for auction in Dublin. At the time, Ireland was in the throes of an IMF bailout and funding across all cultural institutions was grinding to a halt. This was the background...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Oct 2018

Band of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.Mention the word 'alchemist' and the images that spring to mind are likely the same ones that have been around for centuries. Perhaps you will imagine something like Pieter Brugle’s 1558 depiction; a...
From: Conciatore on 30 Jul 2018

Favorite Recipes: Social Networks in the Pages of a Regional Community Cookbook

By Rachel A. Snell In the late 1920s, members of the Mount Desert Chapter No. 20 of the Order of the Eastern Star compiled a cookbook of favorite recipes. During the peak of associational life, from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century,...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Jul 2018

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.