The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "New England"

Showing 1 - 20 of 266

Your search for posts with tags containing New England found 266 posts

March 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Several Negroes to be sold, belonging to said Estate.” Estate notices regularly ran among the advertisements in the Providence Gazette and other colonial newspapers.  On March...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Mar 2022

February 11

Who were the subjects of advertisements in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Negro Man named Prince … A Negro Man named Cesar.” Colonizers placed advertisements in the Essex Gazette, published in Salem, Massachusetts, for a variety...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Feb 2022

January 31

Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “TO BE SOLD A LIKELY Negro Woman.” An advertisement in the January 31, 1772, edition of the New-Hampshire Gazette offered a “LIKELY Negro Woman” for...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2022

Salem Sustainability; or the Most Charming Memoir Ever

I came a delightful short memoir quite by accident yesterday; it was so well-written and charming that I couldn’t stop thinking about it so I decided to write about it today to get it out of my head! It’s not about any BIG thing or event; in fact,...
From: streets of salem on 9 Dec 2021

Thanksgiving Tradition and Transition

For many years my family spent the long Thanksgiving weekend at the grand old Equinox Hotel in Manchester Village, Vermont, the generous gift of my grandmother. We established several traditions there that ended with her death five years ago, after which...
From: streets of salem on 29 Nov 2021

November 18

GUEST CURATOR:  Kaden McSheffrey Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Ran-away … a Negro Man Servant named CROMARTE.” This advertisement from the Boston-Gazette in November 1771 offers a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Nov 2021

A Picky Guide to October in Salem

I think this might be the first time I’ve written up a “things to do” in Salem for Halloween, a holiday that lasts for at least two months here and seems to be on the way to becoming a year-long “celebration” with perhaps a month break for Christmas....
From: streets of salem on 9 Oct 2021

A Cape Full of Color

So every year in early September we journey to Cape Cod on the weekend after Labor Day for my husband’s birthday. It is an odd time, just after “summer” is over and we have established our fall routines, and I always complain, but off to the Cape...
From: streets of salem on 15 Sep 2021

Cogswell’s Grant

Like several summers in the past, this was supposed to be my “Historic New England Summer” in which I made a determined attempt to visit and write about as many HNE houses as possible. I started out very close to home at the Phillips House, and then...
From: streets of salem on 6 Sep 2021

Summer Sunday Stroll in Salem

Sometimes I try to look at Salem as a tourist, a casual tourist taking a stroll, rather than with my historian/resident intensity. It doesn’t work for long, but I can pull it off for a few hours. I haven’t been home for very many weekends this summer,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Aug 2021

A Bush Garden

Last week I spent a day in Kennebunkport, a town long associated with the Bush family because of Walker’s Point, which was purchased by President H.W. Bush’s maternal great- and grandfather after the turn of the last century. The usual congregation...
From: streets of salem on 23 Jun 2021

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Phillips House

I can’t believe that I’ve been blogging here for eleven+ years and have not featured 1) the only house museum; 2) the only house belonging to Historic New England; and 3) the only house which was (partially) moved to its site on the street where I...
From: streets of salem on 8 Jun 2021

Red Meat for Empire: New England Cattle, the British Empire, and the Disruption of Revolution

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Strother...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 May 2021

April 28

Who were the subjects of advertisements in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “RUN-AWAY … a Negro Man named CUFF … Three Dollars Reward.” “TO BE SOLD, A Negro Man … expert at all husbandry Business.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Apr 2021

February 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Wanted, a Negro Woman, that understands all Kinds of Houshold Work.” The Slavery Adverts 250 Project seeks to identify, remediate, and republish every advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Feb 2021

January 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? SlaveryProvidence Gazette (January 12, 1771).“A Likely strong Negro Man.” On January 12, 1771, an advertisement for a “Likely strong Negro Man, about 28 Years...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Jan 2021

October 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “WANTED immediately, Fifteen likely NEGROES.” As it did in most issues, the Providence Gazette published on October 27, 1770, featured advertisements placed for various...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Oct 2020

September 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Black Boy and Butt in Cornhill.” In an advertisement in the September 13, 1770, edition of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter, Jonathan...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Sep 2020

Tragedy amidst the Everyday

I LOVE Diaries: they offer such personal perspectives into the past, encompassing both “big” events and everyday occurrences. I read diaries, teach with diaries, and think about diaries often. I even like books about diaries, such as Kate...
From: streets of salem on 12 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.