The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "North American History"

Your search for posts with tags containing North American History found 16 posts

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

Teach my Research: Food, Colonization, and Religion in New France

Mairi Cowan and Whitney Hahn [Teach My Researchis a new occasional series at Borealiato help connect research and teaching, putting the latest scholarship on early Canadian history–Indigenous, French, British, or early national, to about 1900–into...
From: Borealia on 13 Jul 2020

New Books in Early Canadian History, May-December

Dani Reimer and Keith Grant Welcome to Borealia’s Spring 2020 roundup of forthcoming books on early Canadian history. The list is drawn from publishers’ catalogues and websites, featuring books scheduled for release between now and the end...
From: Borealia on 25 May 2020

Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America–A Review

Gregory Kennedy Allan Greer, Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America (Cambridge University Press, 2018). This ambitious book considers “the ways in which Europeans and their Euro-American descendants remade...
From: Borealia on 22 Oct 2018

Mapping Land Tenure Pluralism in the St. Lawrence River Valley

Julia Lewandoski [This essay kicks off a Borealia series on Cartography and Empire-on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  After the 1763 Peace of Paris, British officials embarked...
From: Borealia on 26 Sep 2018

An Odyssey or a Contract: Conquests, Cessions, Constitutions and History

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the first in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 17 Sep 2018

Presentism in Environmental History: The View from the Sixteenth Century

Jack Bouchard Note: This is the first in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. In the 1560s, if you were a European mariner in search...
From: Borealia on 4 Jun 2018

Taking the Longer View: Environmental History as Early Modern History

Claire Campbell Welcome to our series on the environmental history of the early modern period! A project of NiCHE, the series is cross-posted here at Borealia. The idea for a series featuring scholarship from the early modern period – and querying...
From: Borealia on 1 Jun 2018

A House in New Orleans: The Le Moyne Family and the Foundation of the Crescent City

Michael J. Davis “We are at present working on the establishment of New Orleans, thirty leagues above the entry of the Mississippi,” wrote the newly-commissioned commandant-général of Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville,...
From: Borealia on 9 Apr 2018

Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World: A Review

Ann Little Adele Perry, Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Critical Perspectives on Empire series. If you’re on Twitter this summer of 2017, perhaps your...
From: Borealia on 5 Jun 2017

A Conversation about Teaching Early Canadian History in the United States, Part 3: Research

This is the third of a three-part conversation between historians Claire Campbell, Alexandre Dubé, Jeffers Lennox, and Christopher Parsons, on being “early Canadianists” in the United States. You can find the rest of the series here....
From: Borealia on 31 Mar 2017

A Conversation about Teaching Early Canadian History in the United States, Part 2: In the Classroom

This is the second of a three-part conversation between historians Claire Campbell, Alexandre Dubé, Jeffers Lennox, and Christopher Parsons, on being “early Canadianists” in the United States. You can find the rest of the series here....
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2017

A Conversation about Teaching Early Canadian History in the United States, Part 1: Cross-border Academic Biographies

About a year ago, Christopher Parsons suggested the idea that Borealia host an online conversation about being “early Canadianists” in the United States. He observed that there are a growing number of such cross-border historians, and still...
From: Borealia on 27 Mar 2017

Remembering Danny Vickers

Jerry Bannister I remember the first day I saw Danny Vickers. It was in September 1986, and he was one of the instructors in my first-year History course, “Ideas and Society in the West,” a team-taught lecture at Memorial University of Newfoundland.  ...
From: Borealia on 10 Feb 2017

Re-Narrating Canadian History after the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Following the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report six months ago, universities across the country are re-evaluating our practices. Both individually (as recently seen at the University of Winnipeg and Lakehead University)...
From: Borealia on 2 Dec 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.