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Your search for posts with tags containing North Carolina found 57 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Travis Copeland on the Attack on North Carolina’s Fort Johnston

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Travis Copeland about a watershed moment in North Carolina’s independence movement, the attack on... The post This Week on Dispatches: Travis Copeland on the Attack on North...

The Samuel Adams of North Carolina: Cornelius Harnett and the Burning of Fort Johnston

On a trip to the southern colonies in 1773, Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts visited the coastal region of North Carolina. He was introduced to... The post The Samuel Adams of North Carolina: Cornelius Harnett and the Burning of Fort Johnston appeared first...

March to Independence: The American Revolution in the Southern Colonies, 1775–1776

BOOK REVIEW: March to Independence: The American Revolution in the Southern Colonies, 1775-1776 by Michael Cecere (Yardley, Pa.: Westholme Publishing for Journal of the American Revolution... The post March to Independence: The American Revolution in...

A Demographic View of the North Carolina Continental Line, 1775–1783

Many North Carolina soldiers served in both the North Carolina militia/state troops and one of the state’s Continental regiments. To complement my study of... The post A Demographic View of the North Carolina Continental Line, 1775–1783 appeared first...

North Carolina Colonel Joseph Williams in the Cherokee Campaign of 1776

“We have every reason to believe,” proclaimed the North Carolina Council of Safety, that “the emissaries of [the British] government are making use of... The post North Carolina Colonel Joseph Williams in the Cherokee Campaign of 1776 appeared first...

The Importance of a Small Skirmish during the Race to the Dan

The Race to the Dan is a famous part of the Southern War of the American Revolution, a strategic retreat by Gen Nathanael Greene,... The post The Importance of a Small Skirmish during the Race to the Dan appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few

Many early histories of the War of Regulation, which culminated in the May 16, 1771 Battle of Alamance, paint a picture of a Regulator... The post A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Odyssey of Loyalist Colonel Samuel Bryan

Colonel Samuel Bryan is thought to be the highest-ranking Loyalist officer to remain in the United States after the Revolutionary War. Despite being a... The post The Odyssey of Loyalist Colonel Samuel Bryan appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Troubled Relationship Between Clinton and Cornwallis and their “War” after the War

A search for scapegoats is certain to follow a lost war, and in the wake of the British disaster at Yorktown in October 1781... The post The Troubled Relationship Between Clinton and Cornwallis and their “War” after the War appeared first on Journal...

North Carolina’s Response to the Battles of Lexington and Concord

Rumors roared throughout the Colonies in the spring of 1775. From Watertown, Massachusetts, with an earnest pen, a letter was taken down at 10... The post North Carolina’s Response to the Battles of Lexington and Concord appeared first on Journal of...

This Week on Dispatches: Travis Copeland on the Capture of North Carolina’s Governor Thomas Burke

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Travis Copeland on the capture of North Carolina’s Patriot governor Thomas Burke by Loyalists... The post This Week on Dispatches: Travis Copeland on the Capture of North Carolina’s...

The Capture of North Carolina Governor Thomas Burke

When the vote came on Tuesday, July 26, 1781, before the House’s evening adjournment, it was Thomas Burke’s turn to hold the Executive office... The post The Capture of North Carolina Governor Thomas Burke appeared first on Journal of the American...

William Tryon and the Park that Still Bears His Name

Fort Tryon Park, sixty-seven acres just north of the George Washington Bridge in Manhattan, is a bucolic refuge among the skyscrapers of New York... The post William Tryon and the Park that Still Bears His Name appeared first on Journal of the American...

North Carolina and Public Spirit in the American Revolution, 1775–1783

In the South, the American Revolution was largely a civil war, one between Whig supporters of American liberties and Loyalists or Tories, who remained... The post North Carolina and Public Spirit in the American Revolution, 1775–1783 appeared first...

The Admission of North Carolina and Rhode Island into the Union

On November 21, 1789, the people of the state of North Carolina ratified the United States Constitution. On May 29, 1790, the people of... The post The Admission of North Carolina and Rhode Island into the Union appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Impeachment of Senator William Blount—the First in American History

It is easy to suggest that William Blount made no significant contribution to the development of the United States. His achievements, although not negligible,... The post The Impeachment of Senator William Blount—the First in American History appeared...

Biographical Sketches of Royal Militia Commanders in the South Carolina Mid- and Lowcountry, North Carolina, and Georgia, 1780–8

Introduction This article supplements one relating to royal militia commanders in the South Carolina Backcountry that appeared in the Journal of the American Revolution... The post Biographical Sketches of Royal Militia Commanders in the South Carolina...

A Demographic View of North Carolina Militia and State Troops, 1775–1783

After nearly a quarter of a millennium, what do we really know about the militia and state troops that served during the Revolutionary War?... The post A Demographic View of North Carolina Militia and State Troops, 1775–1783 appeared first on Journal...

The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 178

In September 1780, writing from Hillsborough, North Carolina, just one month after the disastrous defeat at Camden, Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates penned a disconcerted... The post The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

From Prisoner to Schoolmaster: The Revolutionary War Story of Lt. Thomas White

Thomas White, a twenty-two-year-old farmer in Chester County, Pennsylvania, answered the call to fight for the establishment of a new nation. The choice altered... The post From Prisoner to Schoolmaster: The Revolutionary War Story of Lt. Thomas White...

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