The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Nova Scotia"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Nova Scotia found 31 posts

Interview: Ruma Chopra on “Almost Home: Maroons between Slavery and Freedom in Jamaica, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone”

Ruma Chopra’s recent book is Almost Home: Maroons between Slavery and Freedom in Jamaica, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone (Yale University Press, 2018). This interview was conducted by Roberto Sirvent, and was originally published at the Black Agenda...
From: Borealia on 20 Jan 2021

Land Grants, Religious Exemptions, and Aid on the Ground: The Role of Local Government in the Resettlement of Loyalist Refugees after the American Revolution

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Alexandra Mairs-Kessler                        ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Jan 2021

Settler colonial violence and the Maritime fisheries

Angela Tozer Canadian settler colonialism set the stage for the current attacks on Mi’kmaw fishers from Sipekne’katik First Nation. From the end of summer and into the fall of 2020, settler fishers argued that the Department of Fisheries and...
From: Borealia on 23 Nov 2020

The Board of Trade and Plantations, 1688–1761

There were four bodies that directly influenced England’s relationship with her American colonies; they were the King (a body of one), the Privy Council... The post The Board of Trade and Plantations, 1688–1761 appeared first on Journal of...

The State and Organized Rifle Shooting in Nova Scotia in the 1860s

R. Blake Brown [This essay is part of a series of contributions to be published over the coming years by members of the research group “Military Service, Citizenship, and Political Culture: Studies of Militias in Atlantic Canada.”...
From: Borealia on 24 Aug 2020

“Very Cold & Nothing Remarkable”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund Hagen, Privateer and Prisoner of War, Part 2 of

This article continues an examination of the journal kept by Dr. Edmund Hagen of Scarborough, Maine, begun in “Dispatch’t to America’: the Journal of... The post “Very Cold & Nothing Remarkable”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund...

Decorous Dispossession: Legally Extinguishing Acadian Landholding Rights

Elizabeth Mancke [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton Regional...
From: Borealia on 30 Jul 2019

Reconciling Chignecto: The many stories of Siknikt

Anne Marie Lane Jonah [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton...
From: Borealia on 16 Jul 2019

July 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston-Gazette (July 3, 1769). “AMERICAN GRINDSTONES.” Benjamin Edes and John Gill, printers of the Boston-Gazette, operated a partisan press that supported the American...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jul 2019

The Consequences of Loyalism

The Consequences of Loyalism: Essays in Honor of Robert M. Calhoon edited by Rebecca Brannon and Joseph S. Moore (University of South Carolina Press, 2019)... The post The Consequences of Loyalism appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Colonial Canada: Making the Familiar Dis/Comfortingly Strange

Daniel Samson In my introductory colonial Canadian survey course, students sometimes complain that I spend “all” of my time on Nova Scotia. That’s not actually true, but I understand their point. It may be true that I talk about Nova...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2018

True Interests: Environmental History and National Ambition (Or, Let’s Squish Canada)

[This is the fourth essay of the Borealia series Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Claire Campbell Borders have been in the news these past...
From: Borealia on 17 Oct 2018

3 Strange Buttons Help Archaeologists Identify 18th Century Skeleton As Foreign-Born Soldier.

Pewter buttons found underneath the pelvis of an 18th century male skeleton buried at Fortress Louisbourg, Canada. AMY SCOTThttps://www.forbes.com/sites/kristinakillgrove/2018/09/07/3-strange-buttons-help-archaeologists-identify-18th-century-skeleton-as-foreign-born-soldier/#7a849a027bfe
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Sep 2018

Mary Robie and the Didactic Qualities of Reading Fiction

Mary Robie, a Massachusetts refugee living in revolutionary Nova Scotia, did not mince words when she criticized her friends for simply “passing thro life”... The post Mary Robie and the Didactic Qualities of Reading Fiction appeared first...

Teaching the Politics and Meaning of Maps

Claire Campbell   I like maps. A lot. I used to study the Rand McNally Road Atlas on long car trips. Sometimes when I’m homesick I’ll meander through Halifax on Google Streetview. And this year I’m team-teaching a new course on...
From: Borealia on 26 Mar 2018

New Brunswick Lighthouses and Colonial Spaces, 1784-1867

Zachary A. Tingley Lighthouses, once a lifesaving beacon of hope for mariners facing the elements, are themselves now in need of rescue. In communities up and down the Atlantic coast, local communities have organized to preserve lighthouses that, while...
From: Borealia on 19 Mar 2018

A Community of Suffering: The Robie Women in Loyalist Halifa

G. Patrick O’Brien Having spent an agreeable New Year’s Eve with her friends, nineteen-year-old Mary Robie paused to write in her diary before turning in for the night. “Which brings 1783 to a period,” she began, “I have...
From: Borealia on 8 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.