The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Novels"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Novels found 506 posts

‘You Sink Your Voice’: The Subtle Art of Listening in Persuasion

What’s in a voice? According to recent research, quite a lot. In her article “Only 4 Syllables Needed to Recognize Voice,” Madeline McConnell says humans can identify familiar voices in as few as four syllables, or two words. That’s better than...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 May 2022

Give a gift of love: Jane Austen’s illustrated novels

I own quite a few copies of each of Jane Austen’s novels. Many are annotated, some are old editions or designed for children. Others are illustrated with different artists, many of whom are well known. Most recently I purchased Sense and Sensibility...
From: Jane Austen's World on 3 Apr 2022

Teaching Students to Read Secondary Sources with Age of Revolutions

By Erika Vause In his seminal 1961 essay “The Historian and His Facts,” E.H. Carr compared writing history to preparing fish. Carr argued against seeing history as a “corpus of ascertained facts” lying “like fish on the fishmonger’s slab,”...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Mar 2022

Northanger Abbey’s “Horrid Novels”

In Austen’s youth, sentimental romances and sensational Gothic novels full of dramatized heroines, dark towers and dungeons, and dangerous male villains became popular. These included novels like Charlotte Smith’s Emmeline (1788), which some believe...
From: Jane Austen's World on 14 Feb 2022

Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (2006) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, United Kingdom. He researches the life and works of several Victorian popular fiction authors and occasionally reads twenty-first century literature. Introduction At first glance, Cormac...

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Branding Needle” and the First French Commune | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Previous discussions on the first six volumes can be found here: ...

Victor Hugo’s “Ninety-Three” (1874) | Stephen Basdeo

Thus the guillotine had a right to say to the tower: “I am thy daughter.”[1] …So wrote Victor Hugo in Ninety-Three (1874). By the time that Hugo had published Ninety-Three—his final novel—he had been witness to some of the defining events...

Bath: An Adumbration in Rhyme, by John Matthews. A Critical Edition for Readers of Jane Austen. Series Editor: Ben Wiebracht. Review by Vic

Inquiring readers: Many of you who have visited here before are aware of Dr. Wiebracht’s online senior high school students’ research on John Matthews’s 18th century poem “Bath: An Adumbration in Rhyme.” This link leads to their published work,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Sep 2021

A Brief History of Crime Literature | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK.[1] Unless otherwise stated, all images are from books in my private collection. There are few subjects that interest us more generally, than the adventures of robbers and banditti. In...

The Janissary and Massacre of the Christians (1850) [Part 2] | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following short story was written by George W.M. Reynolds and published in two instalments in Reynolds’s Miscellany during 1850. Set in the 1300s, at a time when Ottoman forces were making inroads into Europe, it tells the story of Sisman, a young...

The Janissary and Massacre of the Christians (1850) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following short story was written by George W.M. Reynolds and published in two instalments in Reynolds’s Miscellany during 1850. Set in the 1300s, at a time when Ottoman forces were making inroads into Europe, it tells the story of Sisman, a young...

A Tale of the Great Plague (c.1840) | Thomas Hood

Thomas Hood (1799–1845) was born in London and, his father being a bookseller, grew up around books. He went on to become a poet, novelist, and satirist. Most famous for his poetry, William Michael Rossetti in 1903 declared him “the finest English...

The Early Works of Eugene Sue | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Poniard’s Hilt” and the Arrival of Feudalism in France | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Visionary French Author Eugene Sue (Stephen Basdeo Collection)...

Jane Austen, Mathematician by Victoria Grossack

Inquiring readers: Victoria Grossack, FCAS, the author of this piece and an actuary, sent this highly interesting article about Jane Austen and mathematics, a first topic for this blog. Enjoy! Janeites esteem Jane Austen as a literary genius. Her characters...
From: Jane Austen's World on 15 Aug 2021

G. W. M. Reynolds’s ‘Memoirs’ Novels (1850–57) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and is currently writing a book with Mya Driver titled Victorian England’s Best-Selling Author: The Revolutionary Life of G.W.M. Reynolds (exp. 2022). Illustration from the Seamstress:...

Animals in Jane Austen’s Novels

Inquiring readers, I recently wrote a post about the important but largely unseen parts servants played in Jane Austen’s novels. As I looked into the topic, animals were also mentioned. So much information exists that I decided to write about their...
From: Jane Austen's World on 6 Jul 2021

The Sisters: A Tale| Susannah Frances Reynolds

I. It was on Midsummer’s-day in the year 1817, that, at about six o’clock in the morning, the sudden din of a cannon, issuing from the guard-ship at Brest, alarmed the peaceful fishermen who were preparing their nets on the shore, the busy watermen...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.