The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Old Vic"

Your search for posts with tags containing Old Vic found 14 posts

The Old Vic at

The Old Vic, London 11 May 2018 is the 200th anniversary of the opening of one of the most important theatres in the UK, known as the Old Vic. It was originally named the Royal Coburg Theatre, after Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg and his wife Princess...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 May 2018

London stage, 2016: a year for the women

Best female performances: Jade Anouka, Adelayo Adedayo It’s been a rich year for female roles. Denise Gough in People Places and Things (Wyndham, transferred from the National Theatre) as the lying, addicted anti-heroine deservedly got an Olivier,...
From: Parthenissa on 1 Jan 2017

Women taking power in Shakespeare’s plays

Glenda Jackson as King Lear 2016 seems to have been characterised by women staging a takeover of traditional male roles, at least as far as Shakespeare is concerned. While planning this post I was hoping to be able to link this trend to the election...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Nov 2016

Shakespeare, theatre, and the Great War

Over the past few weeks we have been remembering the battle of the Somme that began on 1 July 1916 and continued for five long and bloody months. On the first day alone 19,240 men lost their lives. Even before the start of this battle, the country, that...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Jul 2016

Love for Love at Bristol Old Vic

One of the best things about living in Bristol (and let’s be fair, there are MANY great things about living in this amazing, vibrant city) is being able to hang out at the beautiful Old Vic theatre on King Street, which still retains many of its...
From: Madame Guillotine on 9 Jul 2015

Canadian Theatre’s Youth Problem? Still There.

I got into a bit of a squabble on Facebook today with Kelly Nestruck about Stratford and what I described as its unwillingness to hand over substantial, youthful parts to youthful, perhaps inexperienced, actors. Kelly countered that Stratford employs...
From: dispositio on 11 Jan 2015

Swallows and Amazons at Bristol Old Vic

Swallows and Amazons: Photo: Bristol Old Vic/Simon Annand. I’ll admit that thanks to a combination of depression, illness and other assorted woes, I haven’t been feeling as festive as I might otherwise have done as we hurtle through December. I’m...
From: Madame Guillotine on 6 Dec 2014

The Libertine

John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, Huysmans, Private Collection. Photo: my own. Today marks the 384th birthday of one of my most favourite British kings, Charles II and what more fitting way could there be to commemorate it than with a review of the...
From: Madame Guillotine on 29 May 2014

Jane Eyre at Bristol Old Vic

“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! – I have as much soul as you, – and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have...
From: Madame Guillotine on 25 Feb 2014

Shakespeare and the National Theatre

Rufus Norris On 15 October it was announced that Rufus Norris was to be appointed to the most important job in UK theatre, as Artistic Director of the National Theatre, taking over in April 2015. Then next week, on 22nd October the National Theatre celebrates...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 18 Oct 2013

Kenneth Branagh’s Macbeth: an interpretation for our times?

Sir Kenneth Branagh’s “electrifying” and “immersive” production of Macbeth is the current hot Shakespeare ticket, playing for just a month in a disused church in Manchester that seats only 250 people. It’s ensured that...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Jul 2013

Seeking A Midsummer Night’s Dream in “the winds of March”

Image for the Bristol Old Vic production It’s the beginning of March and signs of spring are still few and far between after a long and dreary winter. What does the dedicated Shakespeare-lover need to cheer themselves up? A Midsummer Night’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 4 Mar 2013

Women in the theatre: what next after Julius Caesar?

Harriet Walter as Brutus Phyllida Lloyd’s all-female production of Julius Caesar has now opened to great reviews: here are two from the Guardian and the Observer. More information, including an image gallery, is available on the Donmar Warehouse’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Dec 2012

So who did invent the Shakespearean Theatre?

The reconstructed Globe Theatre Who invented the “Shakespearean theatre”? Burbage and Shakespeare and/or Henslowe and Alleyn?  This is the title of a one-day conference being held at the University of Reading this Saturday coming, 24 November. Because...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 19 Nov 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.