The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Oliver Cromwell"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Oliver Cromwell found 48 posts

Robin Hood and his Crew of Soldiers (1660)

By Stephen Basdeo This is a précis of a chapter from my book Robin Hood: The Life and Legend of an Outlaw (2019), the Ebook of which is currently on sale from the publisher Pen and Sword (Click Here For More Information). [1] While the late-sixteenth...

‘The Perils of Being an Early-Modern Bottle-Blonde’ – A Guest Post by Pete Langman

It’s quite usual to compliment the author of a work of historical fiction on their research, even though this doesn’t mean much more than ‘we’ve read the same history books’, but there is something to be said for appropriating...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Jan 2020

Jigs

A couple of years ago I was sitting in the British Library calling up various documents that might be ballad-related, when I came across John Balshaw’s Jig. What really captured my interest was the fact that Balshaw apparently wrote the piece in...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Sep 2019

Is Brexit another Revolution?

A touch of history, frustrations with Brexit, regret for my family, and coming from Sunderland. … More Is Brexit another Revolution?
From: Writing Privacy on 15 Mar 2019

Rescinding the Rump

The official response to the Peabody Essex Museum’s reluctant admission to the removal of Salem’s historical archives to a storage facility in Rowley was the formation of a “Working Group” by Mayor Kimberley Driscoll and PEM CEO...
From: streets of salem on 25 Apr 2018

Topsy-Turvy

I find myself these days full of feelings of dissent and resistance but looking for more whimsical ways to express the same, as you can’t be strident all the time. It’s boring, and exhausting. So a flashing reference caught my attention, to...
From: streets of salem on 16 Feb 2018

The strange case of Oliver Cromwell’s execution…

Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England, was executed on 30th January 1661 – two and half years AFTER his death… https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofEngland/Oliver-Cromwell/

Book Review: The White King – Charles I by Leanda de Lisle

The White King, Charles I, Traitor, Murderer, Martyr by Leanda de Lisle certainly has quite a provocative title. Charles I remains a very polarising figure, in much the same manner as his contemporary, Oliver Cromwell, and the labels of “traitor”...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 30 Sep 2017

Q&A with Carla Pestana on The English Conquest of Jamaica

Casey Schmitt interviews Carla Gardina Pestana about her new book, "The English Conquest of Jamaica" (Harvard University Press, 2017).
From: The Junto on 16 Aug 2017

Book Review of Carla Gardina Pestana’s The English Conquest of Jamaica

It is an exciting time to be a scholar of Caribbean history. From conferences to publications, the past decade has seen historians of early America, Latin America, and the Atlantic world turn to the Caribbean for insights into the development of empire,...
From: The Junto on 15 Aug 2017

Guest Post : Elizabeth Gibson, née Smith (1646-1692), ‘My Dear Wife’

Today, we are honoured to have Sara visit our blog, so bear with us while we travel slightly further back in time with her whilst she tells us the story of one early modern woman. Sara’s book Maids, Wives, Widows: Exploring Early Modern Women’s...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Apr 2017

Marvell, Dryden, and the Horatian Ode

There is no hard evidence that Andrew Marvell’s 'Horatian Ode' ever left his hands. Yet, it may have come to John Dryden’s attention. How is Dryden the privileged one? A brief study of hard and soft evidence. Continue reading →
From: Writing Privacy on 16 Feb 2017

When Truth Exceeds Fiction – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

Thank you so much for hosting me today, Andrea. I love having an opportunity to share my passion for the 17th century with a soul sister! I thought I would take a moment to talk about the inspiration behind my recent release THE KING’S MAN which...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 14 Sep 2015

The Fortnight for Freedom: St. John Southworth

The Archdiocese of Westminster celebrates its martyr saint today, St. John Southworth, executed for the crime of being a priest in 1654. He had been arrested and protected by Queen Henrietta Maria and suffered imprisonment and exile. Returning to London,...

‘The Stuarts in 100 Facts’ is now available to pre-order!

Hi, Everyone! I hope this finds you all well. I had quite a nice surprise yesterday when I checked my Amazon profile – I saw that 100 Facts is available to pre-order now, and the cover image features Prince William II of Orange. Although not a Stuart...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 14 May 2015

Book Review: Competing Visions of Empire

Review: Abigail L. Swingen, Competing Visions of Empire: Labor, Slavery, and the Origins of the British Atlantic Empire (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015). There have been some fantastic new contributions of late that explore connections between...
From: The Junto on 6 May 2015

A Time of Profound Change: A Guest Post By Ann Swinfen

Please welcome Ann Swinfen to The Seventeenth Century Lady! A Time of Profound Change By Ann Swinfen I have published two novels set in the seventeenth century: Flood and This Rough Ocean. Why the seventeenth century? This is a period which some people...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 4 Feb 2015

30 January 1649: The Execution of Charles I

The execution of Charles I, king of England, Scotland and Ireland, on 30 January 1649 was unprecedented in its day. As historian Blair Worden explains, Charles' death 'left an indelible mark on the history of England and on the way that the English think...
From: Conor Byrne on 30 Jan 2015

A Sad Anniversary: The Desecration of Oliver Cromwell's Tomb

From The Wall Street Journal (subscription required) comes this review of Lord Charles Spencer's latest book:On Jan. 26, 1661, in Westminster Abbey, the tomb of Oliver Cromwell was broken open and his corrupted corpse was removed. Four days later,...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.