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Search Results for "Opinion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Opinion found 97 posts

OpEd | HECAA at 25 Conference Recap

Back home from the HECAA at 25 Conference in Dallas, I feel my mind still whirling from what was perhaps the best conference I’ve ever attended. As strange as it may sound, a previous contender for me had been CSECS 2001 in Saskatoon, which...
From: Enfilade on 6 Nov 2018

Puerto Rico and the Regional Caribbean

For early Americanists, the past two decades have seen an increase in scholarship connecting the early modern Caribbean to colonial North America. The Caribbean adds significant depth and dimension to discussions of race, slavery, diplomacy, capitalism,...
From: The Junto on 25 Sep 2018

Frogs and Cats, or, Access and Privilege

I have never heard anything like those frogs. I was crunching along the gravel walkway from Historic Jamestowne back to the bus after the final reception of the Omohundro Institute conference in June. As I walked through the woods, the James River at...
From: The Junto on 5 Sep 2018

Making the Personal Historical: Reflections on Pregnancy and Birth

Lindsay Keiter considers how being a historian influenced her experience of pregnancy and childbirth.
From: The Junto on 25 Jul 2018

Part of the Long History of Child Trafficking: 18th-Century French Louisiana

As we continue to learn more about the seizure and internment of migrant infants and children, both along the U.S.-Mexico border and in ICE raids throughout the nation, historians have asked us to wrestle with our long history of child-snatching, family...
From: The Junto on 27 Jun 2018

Trans-American Crossings Recap

Over the weekend, an international group of scholars met on the campus of Brown University to participate in a conference focused on various forms of enslaved migrations throughout the Americas from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. Sponsored...
From: The Junto on 4 Jun 2018

A Survey of Assumptions

With spring well underway, many of us are experiencing the satisfaction of marking the last grade on the final blue book of the semester, with an eye toward the approaching summer months and the freedom to work on our own research projects.[1] This makes...
From: The Junto on 21 May 2018

A President, a Cardinal, and a Soldier walk into a bar…

Roy Rogers reviews the video game "The Council, Episode One: The Mad Ones" by Big Bad Wolf.
From: The Junto on 23 Apr 2018

Atlantic Families, Race, and Empire

Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833. By Daniel Livesay. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2018....
From: The Junto on 19 Apr 2018

Inspiration Roundtable: Haunting Sources

Today, Lindsay O’Neill, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Southern California, joins our weeklong discussion about sources and inspiration. Her first book, The Opened Letter: Networking in the Early Modern British World, was published...
From: The Junto on 29 Nov 2017

About that AHA Jobs Chart

People's look-on-the-bright-side comments look a lot like advice someone might have given in 1969: Remember, there are always exciting job opportunities for hardworking people who know how to make steel.
From: The Junto on 20 Nov 2017

Guest Post: Patriotism, Partisanship, and “The Star-Spangled Banner”: A View from the Early Republic

Billy Coleman is a Postdoctoral Fellow in History at the Kinder Institute for Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri. He received his PhD from University College London (UCL), and is currently completing a book manuscript called,...
From: The Junto on 28 Sep 2017

Guest Post: Review of An Aqueous Territory

Today’s review is by James Hill, who received his Ph.D. from the College of William & Mary in 2016 and is currently an Assistant Professor of History at the University of the Bahamas. He has published articles in Early American Studies (Winter...
From: The Junto on 27 Jun 2017

Every Historian Her Own Adventurer

This spring, early Americanists were abuzz about "a bit of real-life archival drama," as Harvard scholars Danielle Allen and Emily Sneff announced that they had discovered something pretty amazing: an unknown, manuscript, parchment copy of the Declaration...
From: The Junto on 1 May 2017

Digital Identity in Graduate School

Last week, the Arts & Sciences Graduate Center at William and Mary hosted a Digital Identity Roundtable to discuss the benefits, pitfalls, and protocols for graduate students who currently use social media for networking and scholarship, and for those...
From: The Junto on 21 Feb 2017

Reminder to join the conversation “Where Historians Work: A View from Early America”

A reminder that there's still time to join the conversation on "Where Historians Work: A View from Early America."
From: The Junto on 8 Feb 2017

Where Historians Work: A View from Early America

Inspired by the AHA's "Where Historians Work" database, Katy Lasdow starts a conversation on The Junto blog about career diversity for Early American History PhDs.
From: The Junto on 2 Feb 2017

Manufacturing Bodies: A Review of Slavery at Sea

Writing a book review a day after Karin Wulf’s entertaining analysis of what makes for a good review might be hubris at its worst, or simply bad timing. And, while I will never have the expertise, style, and prose that made Annette Gordon-Reed’s...
From: The Junto on 10 Jan 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.