The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Other"

Showing 1 - 20 of 307

Your search for posts with tags containing Other found 307 posts

Life without parole: the strange case of Typhoid Mary

The way George Soper told it, it might have been a case for Sherlock Holmes. “The typhoid epidemic that broke out in the Summer home of Mr George Thompson at Oyster Bay was a puzzling affair,” he told the New York Times. It was 1906 and typhoid was...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Nov 2021

An Experience of Home Births in Rural Ireland: 1883 – 1903

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 27 Sep 2021

September 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Sell at least as low as they were ever sold on the Continent of America.” Some merchants and shopkeepers named their businesses after the signs that marked their locations,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Sep 2021

18 July, 1597 - The Wise Man of West Chester and a departure

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago... Henslowe writes:  marten slather went for the company of my lord admeralles men the 18 July 1597 18 | tt at wisman  | 01 | 10 In modern English:Martin Slater...
From: Henslowe's Diary ... as a Blog! on 18 Jul 2021

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Casque’s Lark”

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds UK. Eugene Sue Introduction In 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote the Communist Manifesto. In it, they argued that all history was essentially the history of class struggle....

Fathers in the Home: the Longview

Family, home, work, and schooling have collided in the last year thanks to Covid. This has made visible the tensions between different parts of our lives and brought into stark relief gender stereotypes about caring. These issues were the spur to an...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 11 Jun 2021

The end of “churlish winter’s tyranny”: February in Shakespeare’s Stratford

A swan on the Avon by Shakespeare’s church Not many people are sorry to see the end of February, and with it the end of meteorological winter. If we’re lucky it’s also the end of what Shakespeare called “churlish winter’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Feb 2021

Forget Leaving Room for Jesus: Fornication and Community Control in Transitional New England

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 23 Feb 2021

reading in a hellscape

Well, this year didn’t go the way we thought it was going to at the start, did it? And I can’t even really remember this year accurately it turns out. I thought I hardly read anything, but I read slightly more than I did last year—65...
From: Wynken de Worde on 31 Dec 2020

Drumming wombs & fanny farts: Listening to the widow’s belly in seventeenth-century Ireland.

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 25 Jun 2020

1793 American Mother & Child

1793 Ralph Earl (1751-1801). Sarah McCurdy (Mrs. Henry Channing) and Son Henry William
From: 18th-century American Women on 19 May 2020

1757 American Mother & Child

1757 John Singleton Copley (1737-1815) Mrs Daniel Rea and Child.
From: 18th-century American Women on 15 May 2020

1796 American Mother & Child

1796 Ralph Earl (1751-1801) Mrs Elijah Boardman and Son
From: 18th-century American Women on 13 May 2020

1783 American Mother & Child

1783 Ralph Earl (1751-1801) Lady Williams and Child
From: 18th-century American Women on 11 May 2020

1760 American Mother & Child

1760 Joseph Blackburn (fl in the colonies 1754-1763). Mrs Isaac Winslow and Hannah.
From: 18th-century American Women on 9 May 2020

1763 American Mother & Child

1763 William Johnston (1732-1772). Mrs Jacob Hurd & Child.
From: 18th-century American Women on 7 May 2020

1799 American Mother & Child

1799 John Brewster Jr. (1766-1854) Lucy Knapp Mygatt and Her Son George.
From: 18th-century American Women on 5 May 2020

1770 American Mother & Child

1770 John Durand (fl 1765-1782). Martha Tucker (Mrs. Thomas Newton II).
From: 18th-century American Women on 3 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.