The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Paint"

Showing 1 - 20 of 239

Your search for posts with tags containing Paint found 239 posts

Rhoda Moreland (fl. 1721-1736)

Rhoda Moreland was a milliner on Leadenhall Street and freemen of the Painter-Stainers’ Company. Moreland was admitted to the Painter-Stainers’ Company by patrimony on 2 December 1724.[1] She was described as a ‘Milliner in Leadenhall...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Judith Gresham the younger (1662 – 1728)

Judith Gresham the younger was a freemen of the Painter-Stainers’ Company and milliner on the Royal Exchange. Baptised on 25 November 1662 in the parish of St Peter le Poer, she was the daughter of Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham.[1] She...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Mary Gresham (1668 – 1726)

Mary Gresham was a milliner and freemen of the Painter-Stainers’ Company working on the Royal Exchange in London. The daughter of Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham, Mary Gresham was baptised on 6 December 1668 and she worked with her mother...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Judith Gresham (1632 – 1694)

Judith Gresham was a milliner on the Royal Exchange in the late seventeenth century. Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham were married on 26 February 1660 and thereafter had five children.[1] They were long-standing tenants of the Royal Exchange...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Ultramarine Blue

 Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could...
From: Conciatore on 14 Aug 2020

Glass of Montpellier

Montpellier, France, in the seventeenth century.(Attribution unknown)Montpellier is an old city in southern France. It stands about halfway between Marseille and the Spanish border along the Mediterranean Sea (strategically located slightly inland to...
From: Conciatore on 3 Jul 2020

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/griffing/107LeavingNoTracks.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Apr 2020

New Frontier Art Painting/Prints

Hunting Partners By David Wright.Misty Crossing By David Wright.Available from: https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/Originals/Originals_MainHMTA2020index.htm;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 21 Apr 2020

Ultramarine Blue

Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could not...
From: Conciatore on 21 Feb 2020

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxton

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxtonhttps://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/buxton/66SomethingSplashing.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Feb 2020

Ultramarine Blue

Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could not...
From: Conciatore on 16 Dec 2019

December 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “All the above is the Produce & Manufacture of North-America.” John Gore sold paint and supplies at his shop at “the Sign of the PAINTERS ARMS, in Queen-Street”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Dec 2019

Media Moment 1: Bristol’s Audits

This blog introduces a new series of posts related to Middling Culture research: Media Moments.  These posts will provide short “glimpses” into topics that relate to ordinary, everyday lives in early modern England under the scope...
From: Middling Culture on 10 Oct 2019

David Garrick’s Apotheosis today

George Carter’s Apotheosis of Garrick The 250th anniversary of the Garrick Jubilee has been celebrated in a number of ways in Stratford-upon-Avon during September 2019. Church bells have been rung, Morris dancers have performed, talks and exhibitions...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Sep 2019

The Glass of Montpellier

Montpellier, France, in the seventeenth century.(Attribution unknown)Montpellier is an old city in southern France. It stands about halfway between Marseille and the Spanish border along the Mediterranean Sea (strategically located slightly inland to...
From: Conciatore on 23 Sep 2019

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANI

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANIhttp://www.dontroiani.com/commissions.shtml;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Sep 2019

Ultramarine Blue

Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could not...
From: Conciatore on 26 Jul 2019

June 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 29, 1769). “Any Branch of the Painting and Gilding Business.” George Kilcup’s advertisement in the June 29, 1769, edition of the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jun 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.