The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Pandemic"

Showing 1 - 20 of 29

Your search for posts with tags containing Pandemic found 29 posts

A Tale of the Great Plague (c.1840) | Thomas Hood

Thomas Hood (1799–1845) was born in London and, his father being a bookseller, grew up around books. He went on to become a poet, novelist, and satirist. Most famous for his poetry, William Michael Rossetti in 1903 declared him “the finest English...

Lucretius’ Plague | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He recommends that readers, if they have not done so already, read his short article on the cultural manifestations of the Athenian Plague before reading this article. The Founding of...

The Athenian Plague | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Introduction The annals of history are littered with accounts of epidemics and pandemics. One of the earliest large-scale pandemics, which affected Ancient Greece and the Middle East...

George R. Stewart’s “Earth Abides” (1949) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. In this post he examines George R. Stewart’s post-apocalyptic pandemic novel Earth Abides (1949). George R. Stewart Introduction By 1949 humanity had experienced two world wars....

Painting a Pandemic: Michiel Sweerts’s “Plague in Ancient City” (1652) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Michiel Sweerts, Plague in an Ancient City, 1652. Oil on canvas. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) Michiel Sweerts (1618–64)...

Painting a Pandemic: Domenico Gargiulo’s “Plague at Naples” (1656)

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Domenico Gargiulo, Largo Mercatello a Napoli durante la peste del 1656. Oil on canvas. Museo Nazionale di San Martino.(Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) It is...

Painting a Pandemic: Napoleon Visiting the Sick

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He has published books and articles on various subjects including the history of crime, radicalism, and socialism. Antoine-Jean Gros, Bonaparte visitant les pestiférés de Jaffa. 1804....

Painting a Pandemic

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK Nicolas Poussin, The Plague at Ashdod, 1631. Oil on canvas. Paris, Louvre (Public Domain Reproduction licensed under Wikimedia Commons) Plagues have left their mark on popular culture:...

First Appearance of Bubonic Plague in History

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Plague, or Yersinia pestis, has “plagued” humankind throughout history. Since at least the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian in the 500s—and likely for much longer before that—it...

A Glasgow Doctor Battles a Cholera Outbreak

On the morning of December 21st [1853], at six o’clock,[i] I was called on by a working man to visit his wife, whom he described as having been taken with cramps about three o’clock the same morning. I went with him to his house, 115 Garscube Road,...

Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man” (1826): An Abridged Version

The visionary writer Mary Shelley has a justifiable claim to have invented the genre of science fiction, notably with the publication of her novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). Frankenstein was not her only novel, however, and Shelley...

Litany in a Time of Plague

Thomas Nashe (1567–1601) was an Elizabethan poet, playwright, and fiction author. He is chiefly remembered as the author of a picaresque novel titled The Unfortunate Traveller; or, The Life of Jack Wilton (1594) and several other minor pieces. The Black...

A Tale of the Plague

William Harrison Ainsworth (1805–82) was an extremely popular author in the early Victorian period. Born in Manchester and originally destined for a career in the law, he was never the most devoted student and disappointed his family by pursuing a literary...

A Student’s Diary of the Spanish Flu (1918)

As students travelled to begin their fall term studies at Montana State College, USA, in 1918, the Spanish Flu pandemic travelled there with them as well. A number of students came down with the flu and the sick among them were housed in special barracks....

Ceræ Volume 8 Call For Papers

Exile, Isolation, and Quarantine 2020 has been a year when exile, isolation, and quarantine have been inescapable. As we try to deal with and make sense of an uncertain present, we look to the past for precedent: research as well as think pieces on...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 28 Dec 2020

Conference Review – Thoughts on the 2020 digital Leeds IMC and the future of meetings and conferences in the age of COVID-19

In this blog post, Victoria Shirley of the Ceræ editorial board shares her impressions of the 2020 virtual Leeds IMC The 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic has upended the models of teaching students and exchanging research that we have used for decades....
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 16 Oct 2020

The Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon goes virtual

The second week in October is when Stratford-upon-Avon’s Shakespeare Club normally begins its season, when up to a hundred members meet in the Music Room at Mason Croft, Marie Corelli’s house and now the home of the Shakespeare Institute for...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Oct 2020

If You Build it, They will Come

Two very different tourist towns during the Pandemic of 2020: at the beginning of the summer, I was up in my hometown of York, Maine, so I wrote about its opening in the midst of Covid with every intention of writing a comparative “bookend”...
From: streets of salem on 29 Sep 2020

Crazy Times: A joint post about 2020 with some advice for new PhDs

It has been a while since we wrote a blog post, the end of January to be exact. A post was partially planned for early March, but we all know what happened then. So here at the start of the academic year of 2020/21 we reflect on the past year and our...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 25 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.