The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Paper cut-outs"

Your search for posts with tags containing Paper cut-outs found 16 posts

D’ye ken John Peel – a reminder of the man behind the song: huntsman, died 13th November 1854.

John Peel, Cumberland farmer and keen huntsman.         Prudence suggests I preface my words with a confession: I am not here to express an opinion one way or another about hunting. I have never hunted, but have never sought to sabotage...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 13 Nov 2017

A journey across the Channel, and a visit to Paris in 1750.

In my current book,  ‘In Bed with the Georgians, Sex Scandal and Satire’ I mention the small-but-beautifully-formed ‘pocket rocket’ known as  Gertrude Mahon. As a teenager she decided to run away to France to get married...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 15 Aug 2017

th November 1759, Hawke’s heroic victory at the Battle of Quiberon Bay.

A week after the naval victory over the French at Quiberon Bay, Richard noted the “Day of General Thanksgiving, observed for the great and plentiful harvest, and the train of successes the Lord has been pleased this year to give us over our Enemies...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 20 Nov 2016

Travel in the Eighteenth Century

Richard Hall kept meticulous details of his travels around the country. He recorded the mileage, he recorded the length of journey and whether he had a meal, he recorded the route and the turnpike tolls, and he recorded the weather on the trip! And at...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 7 Nov 2014

In Black and White – the story of silhouette-maker Auguste Edouart

Edouart’s self-portrait – in other words he is showing himself in profile, cutting out his profile… On Tuesday 22 September I am giving a talk about 18th Century paper-cutting at the Holburne Museum at Bath. It includes a section about...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 15 Sep 2014

In Black and White – a forthcoming lecture on 18th Century paper-cuts and silhouettes!

Little did I think, when I used some of Richard Hall’s paper cut-outs to illustrate “The Journal of a Georgian Gentleman”, that I would end up not only publishing a separate book, just on his paper-cuts, but also would be lecturing...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Aug 2014

The death of John Aitken, a.k.a. John the Painter, March 10th 1777

On the morning of 10th March 1777 a crowd, estimated as being twenty thousand strong, gathered by the naval dockyard in Portsmouth. Towering above them was the mizzenmast struck from the warship HMS Arethusa, specially erected for the purpose. And the...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 10 Mar 2014

Happy Birthday to Frances, Countess of Jersey, born 25 February 1753.

As obituaries go, this one from the 1821 edition of the Gentleman’s Magazine is perhaps the least revealing: the Countess of Jersey, mother of ten children, died on 25th July. “She was very unpopular at the period of the unhappy marriage of our present...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 25 Feb 2014

Sixteen String Jack – the making of a hero (John Rann).

Sixteen String Jack, courtesy of the British Museum, referring to the fact that he had been acquitted 16 times prior to receiving his death sentence. I am not quite clear why some villains manage to capture the public’s imagination as heroes, while...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 17 Oct 2013

A funeral 233 years ago – 18th Century style – and the undertakers bill!

I recently came across the bill submitted to my ancestor Richard Hall by the Funeral Director on the occasion of the death of his first wife Eleanor in 1780. The undertakers (that is to say, the company which undertook the arrangements….) were John...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 18 Jan 2013

D’ye ken John Peel, huntsman, died 13th November 1854.

John Peel, Cumberland farmer and keen huntsman.         Prudence suggests I preface my words with a confession: I am not here to express an opinion one way or another about hunting. I have never hunted, but have never sought to sabotage...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 13 Nov 2012

31st October – the ‘Butcher of Culloden’ dies this day 1765

Today marks the anniversary of a man who has gone down in history as ‘The Butcher’ – a name oddly enough bestowed on him by his elder brother the Prince of Wales, for political reasons. The two did not get on…   To give him his actual name,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Oct 2012

Paper cut-outs from the Eighteenth Century – the world through the eyes of Richard Hall

From time to time I feature the delicate and beautiful cut-outs made by my ancestor Richard Hall, illustrating life around him in the 18th Century. A number of people commented about the cut-outs so I decided to publish them as a separate book, using...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 20 Oct 2012

The Curious Case of Vernon and Harding – both hanged this day 1736, but lived to tell the tale.

The Third of September 1736 saw a botched double hanging at Gallows Acre, St Michael’s Hill Bristol. Joshua Harding had been sentenced to death for housebreaking. Another man, John Vernon, had been caught stealing from a shop. Thanks to the ferocity...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 3 Sep 2012

More paper cut outs from Richard Hall..

As a quick follow-up to my blog on illustrations cut from paper, showing life in the Georgian era, here are a few more of the cut-outs made by Richard: First, one of two men visiting the dovecote to collect meat during the winter months (a reminder that...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Aug 2012

Paper cut-outs, illustrating life in the Eighteenth Century

Some of the more remarkable groups of papers surviving from my ancestor’s miscellany are the cut-out illustrations. There are dozens of them, and each must have taken a fair amount of time, concentration, a steady hand – and sharp scissors!  The...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 29 Aug 2012